Authorities agree to let Belgium have Guy Theunis

first_img to go further October 5, 2005 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Authorities agree to let Belgium have Guy Theunis RwandaAfrica Receive email alerts The 2020 pandemic has challenged press freedom in Africa February 13, 2020 Find out more RwandaAfrica The Rwandan authorities said yesterday they have agreed to transfer responsibility for carrying out the judicial investigation against Father Guy Theunis to Belgium at the latter’s request. The Belgian foreign ministry said the two countries would have “detailed talks on the technical modalities” for implementing this agreement. Theunis, who is Belgian, would be transferred back to Belgium as soon as the judicial investigation gets under way there. The former editor of the Rwandan magazine Dialogue, Theunis was recently accused by the Rwandan authorities of having a role in planning and inciting the 1994 genocide. He is currently held in the main prison in Kigali. ————————————————————————–11.09.2005 Belgian priest who edited magazine to be tried for genocide, faces death penaltyReporters Without Borders voiced shock and dismay today that one of Rwanda’s people’s courts (known as gacaca) has classified Belgian missionary priest Guy Theunis, the former editor of the Rwandan magazine Dialogue, as a category one genocide suspect and ordered him held in Kigali prison pending trial by an ordinary court.Father Theunis, 60, no longer lives in Rwanda. He was arrested on 5 September while on a stopover in Kigali airport on his way back to Belgium after attending peace and reconciliation seminars in the neighbouring eastern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo.By putting him in category one during a public hearing on 10 September, a gacaca in the Kigali district of Rugenge effectively accused him of being among the “planners, organisers, inciters, supervisors and leaders” of the 1994 genocide. As a result, he faces the death penalty.“Father Theunis has always defended the principles of tolerance and respect for others, and has spent his life combatting racism and ethnic hate, so we are outraged that the Rwandan authorities have now brought these charges against him,” Reporters Without Borders said.The organisation said it was “absurd” that he has been accused of inciting hate for reproducing passages from the extremist newspaper Kangura in Dialogue. “He did indeed quote passages from that newspaper, but he did it with the aim of condemning hate and intolerance.”“We are not fooled,” Reporters Without Borders continued. “Some political score is being settled here. The Rwandan authorities must have given him a visa to enter Rwanda with the aim of trapping him. We are also astonished at the unusual speed of the proceedings and the fact that most of the people who appeared as prosecution witnesses were ruling party members.”Noting that Father Theunis gave space in his magazine to all those who advocated reconciliation, including President Paul Kagame’s opponents, the organisation said it was puzzling that he was arrested now, as he had visited Rwanda several times since 1994, each time with a visa issued by the authorities.“Father Theunis was our correspondent in Rwanda in 1992 and 1993,” Reporters Without Borders added. “We will not forget him and we will not stop proclaiming his innocence and campaigning for his release.”The Company of Missionaries of Africa, to which Father Theunis belongs, has also rejected the charges brought against him. The Belgian authorities summoned the Rwandan ambassador in Brussels on 9 September to voice concern about the case and request an explanation.Theunis is the first foreigner to be brought before the gacacas, which were set up to try the hundreds of thousands of people still held on suspicion of involvement in the 1994 genocide. November 27, 2020 Find out more Help by sharing this information News BBC Africa’s “disproportionate and dangerous” dismissal of a journalist A people’s court has accused Belgian missionary priest Guy Theunis, the former editor of the Rwandan magazine Dialogue, of inciting inter-ethnic hate. “This man has spent his life combatting racism and hate,” says Reporters Without Borders. “We are outraged by the behaviour of the Rwandan authorities.” Reports News News Covid-19 in Africa: RSF joins a coalition of civil society organizations to demand the release of imprisoned journalists on the continent April 6, 2020 Find out more Follow the news on Rwanda Organisation RSF_en last_img read more

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What journalists in France should do if questioned or investigated

first_img “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF says France’s National Union of Journalists (SNJ) and Judicial Press Association (APJ) yesterday published a manual advising journalists in France on how to respond if they are summoned for questioning or are placed under investigation.Its release comes amid considerable concern within the French media about the fact that at least nine journalists – freelancers, journalists employed by leading media outlets and media bosses – have been summoned for questioning in recent weeks by France’s domestic intelligence agency, the DGSI.The manual – which answers such questions as “How should I react if I am summoned as a witness?”, “How should I react if I am placed in police custody” and “Could my office be searched?” – can be downloaded  from the SNJ and APJ websites. There are two versions, short and long.Most of the answers are based on the safeguards for journalists that are recognized by France’s 1881 press freedom law and article 10 (on freedom of expression) in the European Convention on Human Rights.  News Follow the news on France Help by sharing this information FranceEurope – Central Asia Protecting journalistsProtecting sources Citizen-journalistsJudicial harassment Receive email alerts RSF_en News Use the Digital Services Act to make democracy prevail over platform interests, RSF tells EU RSF denounces Total’s retaliation against Le Monde for Myanmar story News News Organisation June 4, 2021 Find out more AFP June 26, 2019 What journalists in France should do if questioned or investigated May 10, 2021 Find out more to go further FranceEurope – Central Asia Protecting journalistsProtecting sources Citizen-journalistsJudicial harassment June 2, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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Rising Home Equity Gives Housing Market a Lift

first_img Home Equity Housing Market NAHB Negative Equity 2015-12-11 Brian Honea The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Previous: Senate Votes to Extend Foreclosure Safeguard for Servicemembers Next: Mortech Mortgage Pricing Technologies Now Integrated with Calyx Point Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Related Articles The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago December 11, 2015 2,172 Views Share Save Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Rising Home Equity Gives Housing Market a Lift Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago While many factors contribute to the overall health of the housing market and economy, home equity is providing a major boost to the overall position of U.S. households.A recent report from the Financial Accounts of U.S. and analysis from the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) found that household holdings of real estate reached $21.826 trillion in the third quarter of 2015, up $1.365 trillion from $20,461 trillion from last year.In addition, the reports showed that home mortgage debt outstanding totaled $9.460 trillion in the third quarter of 2015, up $78.0 billion from last year during the same time.The government report also found that mortgage debt increased 1.6 percent at an annual rate.The NAHB analysis concluded that because household-held real estate grew at a much faster pace than the total amount of mortgage debt outstanding, this means that home equity among consumer grew.According to the Financial Accounts of the U.S., home equity totaled 12.366 trillion in the third quarter of 2015, up 11.6 percent year-over-year, and is now 56.7 percent of household real estate.The amount of underwater mortgages in the U.S. continues to decline, but is not fully helping the housing market on the road to recovery, particularity in many large markets that were heavily impacted during crisis times.The negative equity rate nationwide fell in the third quarter to 13.4 percent of underwater borrowers, down from last quarter’s percentage of 14.4. One year ago, 16.9 percent of homeowners owed more on their home than it’s worth, Zillow’s Negative Equity Report showed.”Negative equity has become almost an afterthought in a handful of the nation’s hottest markets, but is holding back the recovery in dozens of large markets nationwide,” said Dr. Svenja Gudell, Zillow’s Chief Economist.She added, “Despite steady declines in negative equity, many cities are still facing tight inventory, especially among entry-level homes. Those homes that are available are often not in demand and stay on the market for a long time. This can be extremely frustrating for buyers and sellers alike, as they come face to face with the difficult side effects of negative equity.” in Daily Dose, Featured, Market Studies, News Xhevrije West is a talented writer and editor based in Dallas, Texas. She has worked for a number of publications including The Syracuse New Times, Dallas Flow Magazine, and Bellwethr Magazine. She completed her Bachelors at Alcorn State University and went on to complete her Masters at Syracuse University. center_img Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago  Print This Post Tagged with: Home Equity Housing Market NAHB Negative Equity About Author: Xhevrije West Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / Rising Home Equity Gives Housing Market a Lift The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Subscribelast_img read more

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Endangered Amur leopard cubs born at Illinois zoo

first_imgBrookfield Zoo(BROOKFIELD, Ill.) — Two endangered Amur leopard cubs have been born at the Brookfield Zoo in Illinois.The 8-week-old male cubs are “thriving,” Amy Roberts, the Brookfield Zoo’s senior curator of mammals, told ABC News.As they’ve grown, the cubs’ caregivers have been able to tell them apart by their differing appearances and personalities, Roberts said.The cubs have different spots, and one of them has a bolder personality than the other, Roberts said.The last time the mama leopard, Lisa, gave birth, it was to only one cub, so she was the only one for him to play with, Roberts said. Now that Lisa has had twins, she’s getting a bit of down time as they play with each other instead.“They spend a lot of time stalking each other and wrestling each other,” Roberts said.The cubs were born on April 18 but their birth was just announced because veterinarians wanted to give the mother, Lisa, privacy as she bonded and cared for the cubs. During that time, zookeepers mostly monitored the mother and babies from a camera.The photos were taken during the cubs’ 8-week vaccinations, Roberts said. They will be placed in an outdoor habitat to be viewed by the public in mid-July, after they’ve had their second set of shots.“It is our hope that guests will not only enjoy seeing these very charismatic cubs exploring and playing in their outdoor habitat, but will also gain an appreciation for the species and learn why conservation efforts are so important for this leopard,” Roberts said.Amur leopards are critically endangered and fewer than 65 are left in the wild, predominately in one isolated population in far east Russia, and a few in the Jilin Province of northeast China, according to the zoo. The biggest threats the leopards face are poaching, retribution hunting, a decrease in their habitat due to fires, logging and human settlement and a decline in their prey, the zoo said in a press release.In 2013, the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums created the Amur Leopard Global Species Management Plan to help the species survive, according to the zoo.There are currently 82 Amur leopards in 42 accredited zoos in North America, the release states. The nocturnal species are known for their keen senses of hearing, vision and smell and they live in temperate forests with cold winters and hot summers.The cubs have not yet been named.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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