Country-by-country guide to fundraising

first_img  13 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis The Global Fundraising Network, the network of direct marketing agencies, has published an international guide to fundraising for organisations looking to expand their fundraising internationally. Country analyses feature details of the postal system, direct mail response rates, and useful addresses of fundraising organisations. Details are also included of common donation methods, tax-exempt status, data protection issues, and forms of non-profit organisation.The site promises further information for registered users but this facility has not yet been launched. Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Howard Lake | 1 July 2002 | News The contents are based on Fundraising Facts & Figures 2002 – International Fundraising Handbook which was published in print form in November 2001.An events section lists upcoming international conferences and events for fundraisers, but as of today there are only three such events listed.Visit the Global Fundraising Network. Country-by-country guide to fundraisinglast_img read more

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People’s Postcode Trust offers £300,000 for collaborative projects in Scotland

first_img  17 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 13 September 2011 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. The People’s Postcode Trust is again offering £300,000 for charities and community groups in Scotland which are planning to work together on a ‘dream’ project.Last year’s Dream Fund supportive collaborative projects including the promotion and clean up of Edinburgh’s cycle paths, with a London Underground style cycle map for the city created and distributed to well over 30,000 locals.There are three awards available, up to £100,000 each.To be eligible to apply for the Dream Fund, two or more organisations must collaborate on a project, one of which must be a registered charity. Shortlisted proposals will be invited to pitch their ideas to the People’s Postcode Trust’s trustees.The closing date for the first round of funding is 2 December 2011.The People’s Postcode Trust is funded entirely by players of the People’s Postcode Lottery in which players play with their postcodes to win cash prizes. So far it has raised over £14.1 million for charities.www.postcodetrust.org.uk/dream-fund/ People’s Postcode Trust offers £300,000 for collaborative projects in Scotland Tagged with: Funding Scotlandlast_img read more

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Oscar Wilde’s Ring Returns to Magdalen College

first_imgA solid gold ring given as a gift of friendship by Oscar Wilde to his friend William Ward has been returned to Magdalen College almost 20 years after it was stolen from the college library. In a ceremony held on the 4th December, the ring was presented back to the college by George Crump, a commodity trader who had helped track the ring down. Forensic scientists managed to trace Eammon using DNA from blood left at the scene. He was sentenced to two years’ imprisonment for the theft, served alongside a further six years to which he had already been sentenced for an earlier burglary. In a now-published letter, Wilde wrote to Ward: “I am so glad your people liked the ring, and if the Greek lines you quoted to me would fit it would be charming. Perhaps however our initials inside and [Greek Inscription] outside would be all that would fit conveniently.” It is understood that the recovery of the ring is linked intimately with the famous robbery at Hatton Gardens, and the ring apparently emerged shortly after almost £200 million of jewellery was stolen from the safe deposit facility in 2015. By the time police tracked down Mr Andrews, the ring had already been sold to a scrap dealer for £150, a fraction of the £35,000 it is believed to be worth. Fearing that the ring would be melted down and sold for scratch, Magdalen offered a reward of £3,500 for information leading to the ring’s safe recovery. Almost twenty years later, in November this year Arthur Brand, a Dutch art detective, tracked down and retrieved the ring. Mr Brand was able to identify the precious item by the inscription on the exterior of the band which reads “Gift of love, to one who wishes love” in Greek.center_img Police were called to the college library in the early hours of the day after May-Morning in 2002 when Eammon Andrews, formerly a cleaner at Magdalen College, climbed through a skylight and removed the ring from its display case. He smashed the glass covering the cabinet containing the ring and escaped with the item, alongside a set of rowing medals awarded to the college in 1910 and 1932. In the year of Ward’s departure, Oscar Wilde and Reginald Harding gifted him a ring shaped like a belt and buckle, and cast in 18-carat gold. As well as the Greek inscription on the outside, Wilde inscribed the friends’ initials “OFOFWW & RRH to WWW 1876” (Oscar Fingal O’Flahertie Wills Wilde & Reginald Richard Harding to William Welsford Ward 1876) on the inside. Ward donated the ring with a set of letters written between the two friends to Magdalen college at the end of the 19th century. According to Mr Brand, rumours circulated in the art underworld that a Victorian ring with a Russian inscription had appeared on the market. Mr Brand recognised the description as that of Oscar Wilde’s ring (if the Greek were mistaken for Russian). Working with William Veres, an antique dealer based in London, and George Crump, the son of a well-known casino owner with knowledge of the art underworld, Brand retrieved the ring for return to Magdalen College. Oscar Wilde attended Magdalen College from 1874 to 1878, where he read the Greats (classics). It was at Magdalen College where he met William Ward, also a student at the college between 1873 and 1876. Wilde referred to Ward affectionately as ‘Bouncer’ in much of their correspondence. last_img read more

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