Caltech Graduate Student Receives $90,000 “New American” Fellowship

first_img CITY NEWS SERVICE/STAFF REPORT Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday STAFF REPORT Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Education Caltech Graduate Student Receives $90,000 “New American” Fellowship By ANDREW MOSEMAN Published on Tuesday, April 14, 2020 | 4:58 pm Community News Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Justin Lee Credit: Soros FellowshipJustin Lee, an MD and PhD student in the UCLA-Caltech Medical Scientist Training Program, has been awarded a Paul and Daisy Soros Fellowship for New Americans. The program awards a $90,000 graduate school fellowship to children of immigrants, green card holders, naturalized citizens, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival (DACA) recipients, or visa holders in the United States.“I believe being a new American involves being rooted in my Korean heritage while working hard to contribute to the U.S. and serve its people,” Lee says. “I have been incredibly fortunate to be provided innumerable opportunities in the U.S. and plan to take advantage of these opportunities to serve the people around me through medicine and health-technology development.”At Caltech, Lee studies synthetic biology in the bioengineering lab of Mikhail Shapiro, professor of chemical engineering and Heritage Medical Research Institute investigator. He collaborates on a project to engineer the body’s immune cells to respond to cancer-specific signals. Meanwhile, via the UCLA-Caltech collaboration, Lee is training under Linda Liau, chair of UCLA’s department of neurosurgery, to become a neurosurgeon. Within that field, he hopes to use new synthetic-biology techniques to develop cell-based tools for diagnosing and treating cancers such as glioblastoma, an aggressive type that begins in the brain.“I believe that through synthetic biology and cellular engineering, we take the best characteristics of cell-based immunotherapy and bestow new abilities to improve their ability to home in on tumors, sense disease, and initiate a robust cancer-killing program,” he says.Lee’s passion for medicine comes from a deep connection to his grandparents, who played a major role in raising him after the entire family moved to the United States from South Korea and his parents worked long hours to launch and manage a photography business. His grandfather was diagnosed with cancer during Lee’s senior year of high school, and his grandmother suffered a stroke shortly thereafter. “Seeing them in pain before passing away motivated me to pursue a career in medicine,” he says, which he accomplished by devoting himself to science and math as a premed undergraduate at Johns Hopkins before coming to the Caltech-UCLA program. In Shapiro’s lab, Lee says, he can engage in the kind of collaborative, innovative research he had wanted to undertake since he became interested in medical science.“Synthetic biology allows me to engineer cells to have useful characteristics and capabilities that may potentially improve human health,” he says. “It is incredibly fun to design and test different genetic constructs, and it is rewarding to develop new technologies.”Lee was among 30 students chosen for the Soros Fellowships from a pool of 2,211 applicants. Hungarian immigrants Daisy M. Soros and her late husband, Paul Soros (1926–2013), founded the program. Lee credits the discipline and persistence he learned as a Junior Olympic All-American in water polo for helping to guide his path to success. Most importantly, he credits his family and their experience as new Americans.“My family taught me the importance of community, and my story is not one of pulling myself up by the bootstraps,” he says. “I have been incredibly fortunate to be a part of a larger community that has provided support and mentorship, and I know my journey would not have been possible without the sacrifices of many people around me.” Community News STAFF REPORT First Heatwave Expected Next Week Make a comment Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Subscribecenter_img More Cool Stuff faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,PCC – EducationVirtual Schools PasadenaDarrell Done EducationHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Herbeauty10 Special Massage Techniques That Will Make You Return For MoreHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWeird Types Of Massage Not Everyone Dares To TryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyNutritional Strategies To Ease AnxietyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyVictoria’s Secret Model’s Tips For Looking Ultra SexyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Trends To Look Like A Bombshell And 6 To Forget AboutHerbeautyHerbeauty Top of the News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Business News 37 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

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Can the organics survive the current economy?

first_imgEmail Print NewsCan the organics survive the current economy?By admin – April 10, 2009 722 Twitter Linkedin WhatsAppcenter_img Advertisement IT’s the dreaded and now, quite annoying, “R” word, but it has hit everything in its wake. Probably because we have let it. Food, is no different and as we get cuter with our purchases, some will let the luxury of good sound choices slip them by as they aim to make their money go further. Top of the list for the chop would be your free range meats and most likely your organic produce. Some producers may differ and others will agree, but figures released recently can indicate a slight decline in organic sales.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up In Ireland, the decline is apparent but not fully quantified, but in the UK, sales of organic products present a mixed picture, according to a major report published by the Soil Association.Organic food sales have been hit across all sectors, as consumers tighten their belts in the face of the economic downturn. 2008 saw sales in both regions marginally rise by close on two per cent, but this statistic must be seen in the context of overall food price rises rather than sales volume increases.Industry analysts have said that this has been a really difficult period for all retail, and organic sales have suffered along with the rest of the economy. Reports of this nature describe a very mixed picture as consumers react to the financial crisis. But those consumers who are committed to organic products appear to be staying loyal. This shows the underlying resilience of the organic market, which it is believed will grow again once the economy picks up.Figures would suggest that the organic participants have their fan base and those that choose it as a way of life, but it also shows that the increase in conversion is not that forthcoming as people still adopt a “wait and see attitude”.Th UK based organic body, the Soil Association, issued a report recently and it shows there has been a sharp fall in sales of certain products, including fruit, bread and bakery products, soft drinks and prepared foodstuffs, although even in these sectors, some brands are bucking the recessionary trend. In tandem there has been dynamic growth in sales of organic food through farmers’ markets where figures increased an estimated 19 per cent.Tesco is still the market leader in terms of value despite a fall in organic sales of 9.9% in 2008. Other smaller areas of organic production such as textiles and health and beauty products have also experienced very significant growth.Organic shoppers, like all consumers, have been buying fewer premium products and prepared foods, and switching to lower-cost retailers. There is also a focus on cutting waste and cooking from scratch – sales of organic home cooking ingredients increased by a remarkable 13.5% in 2008, while sales of organic prepared foods dropped sharply.Core consumers who may be cutting back are still determined to stick to their organic principles. Over one third of committed organic consumers say they expect to spend more on organic food in 2009, and only 15% expect to spend less. Animal welfare issues attracted a high public profile in 2008 and sales of organic milk, cheese, some meat and poultry grow by 10.6%, 11.5%, 13.3% and 17.7% respectively, demonstrating that where the benefits of organic production are understood commitment remains firm among ethical consumers.Research shows that over a quarter of consumers who do not currently buy organic food “would like to know more about organic products than they do” suggesting potential to broaden the market still further in the future.Whilst volatility in the organic market looks set to remain in 2009, environmental and political challenges to our current food and farming systems will demand that we develop sustainable production methods in the future. Governments have agreed to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 80% by 2050. Such cuts can only be achieved in agriculture by deriving fertility from sunshine and organic matter – as organic farmers do – rather than from fossil fuel-based chemical fertilisers. That is a core belief of the organic way and one that they encourage leaders to exploreOrganic farms like all business face uncertainty and volatility. But there are still significant opportunities in some areas – fruit and arable for instance and in developing genuinely local and regional supply networks. Collaboration will also be key to the success of many farm businesses. Facebook Previous articleThe Expert Comment – Paul NestorNext articleOne giant step into Limerick city adminlast_img read more

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