James DeGale and Hadillah Mohoumadi go head-to-head

first_imgJames DeGale and French challenger Hadillah Mohoumadi square-up at the press conference ahead of their European super-middleweight title clash at Glow, Bluewater, this Saturday.(Video courtesy of iFilm London and Hennessy Sports)See also:Upbeat DeGale eyeing title showdownDeGale discusses Saturday’s fight and his spat with Eubank JnrMohoumadi out to cause an upset in title clash with DeGaleDeGale v Mohoumadi: Watch the pre-fight press conferenceDeGale keen to produce sharper displayDeGale and Harrison weigh in ahead of Saturday’s title fightsFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Lowly Plant Inspires Waterproof Glass

first_imgBy adopting the lotus position, the glass in your windshield may become so water-repellant you won’t need windshield wipers.  That’s what an Ohio State press release says: “Ohio State University engineers are designing super-slick, water-repellent surfaces that mimic the texture of lotus leaves.”  The leaves of the lotus, or water lily, are covered with microscopic bumps that resist water stains.  Soon we may have self-cleaning glass.  Everyone but the window-washing industry should be pleased.How many generations of water lilies had to drown till the right combination of lucky heritable mutations came along?  The simplest things about plants and animals are sometimes just as noteworthy as the dazzling ones.(Visited 6 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Smart farming fights climate change

first_imgThe Smart Agriculture for Climate Resilience programme is the first provincial climate change policy for agriculture in South Africa, and specifically focuses on food security. (Image: Darling Tourism Via Media Club South Africa)A collaboration between the University of Cape Town and two provincial government department seeks to develop long-term resistance methods to climate change.Western Cape agriculture plays an important role in South Africa’s economy in terms of job creation and socio-economic development, even while it is vulnerable to climate change.The university and the departments of agriculture, and environmental affairs and development planning recognised that a strategic and co-ordinated approach was needed to develop long-term resilience to climate change. This could be done through climate-smart agriculture and by placing the sector on a clear pathway towards a green economy.Their collaboration has brought about the Smart Agriculture for Climate Resilience programme. It is the first provincial climate change policy for agriculture in South Africa, and specifically focuses on food security. It promotes climate-smart agriculture.SMART AGRICULTUREThe programme is tied to the Western Cape’s five-year provincial strategic plan and the strategic goals of the provincial department of agriculture. One of the key goals is to optimise the sustainable use of water and land resources to increase climate-smart agricultural production.Collaborative planning and action within and between public and private sectors includes players such as organised agriculture and industry associations, farmers, agri-processors and agri-business, labour and civil society, and research and academic institutions.According to the African Climate and Development Initiative (ACDI), the project has achieved an understanding of expected climate risks as well as effects on and vulnerabilities in agriculture. It has established important linkages between resource sectors, water, energy and agricultural production. It has also shown that vulnerability is high across the sector.The project’s framework to battle the harsh impact of climate change has been its biggest success so far. It has identified regions that have a milder climate and where climate change will not be as dramatic.These may become the future centres of food production.ADAPTING TO A CHANGING CLIMATEThe province has already shown it has the capacity to adapt, with local companies already providing energy-saving low-carbon solutions to farms and agri-businesses. Leading wine estates have installed energy-saving measures and systems for renewable energy generation.The Fruit Look Project is a prime example of how the province is adapting. The project uses satellite images to help fruit farmers increase their irrigation efficiency. These solutions must be harnessed to stimulate innovation and technology transfer for climate change adaptation and mitigation.It takes a strong spatial approach, and has created 23 spatial zones. This is because the risks and effects of climate change differ widely across the province. It is all dependent on climate, soils, vegetation and farming systems.Through this project the western marginal grain zones such as the Rooi Karoo-Aurora, are expected to shift to livestock production. This zone will become hotter and drier. Some zones could benefit from mild warming and wetting, for example the southern GrootBrak-Plett zone.According to the ACDI, the project proposes a focus on four strategic areas, with the aim to:Promote a climate-resilient low-carbon production system that is productive, competitive, equitable and ecologically sustainable.Strengthen effective climate disaster risk-reduction and management for agriculture.Strengthen monitoring, data and knowledge management and sharing, and lead strategic research for climate change and agriculture.Ensure good co-operative governance and joint planning for effective climate change response implementation for agriculture.Public and private partnerships are helping to make South Africa’s food security mission a success. Play your Part too; and send us your story.last_img read more

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Phone Modders, Take Note: HTC Releases Hero Source Code

first_imgWhat it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement jolie odell Following weeks of requests from open-source developers, HTC has released the Hero Android source code on their developer site.In response to the mobile devs, HTC has previously stated it was waiting for its own developers to provide the source before releasing it publicly. As late as last week, HTC representatives had emailed developers saying, “At the moment we do not know when the kernel source for the Hero will be released,” and “We are still pushing our developers to provide us with the source code and for the links to be added.” Since the Android kernel is licensed under the GPL, this delay was creating both dissatisfaction and controversy in the community.However, just as a few developers were beginning to talk about enforcement actions, the company posted the code, and everyone lived happily ever after.Or something along those lines. GPL non-compliance and hints of internal process and delivery issues don’t mode well for the mobile manufacturer. After unfavorable coverage of the company’s “foot-dragging” on Slashdot and long threads of modev complaints, we do hope that HTC’s future Android projects will be more swiftly opened.The Hero, as a device, is significant in itself, hence the enhanced perception of cruelty in HTC’s not releasing its source code sooner. It’s created huge waves in geek circles, beating out the iPhone for Gadget of the Year at the prestigious T3 awards and generating enough gadget-geek slavering to power a small city.So, will the gadget geeks and modevs have to push for open sourcing every time a cool, Android-powered device is released? Where was the major malfunction that led to these delays? Were the HTC engineers thrown under the bus to allow leadership to save face, or do the HTC powers that be simply need to get their engineering team under control? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.center_img Related Posts Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Tags:#mobile#web last_img read more

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The NBA Has A New Generation Of Hometown Heroes

Matt BarnesSacramento Noah is more willing to shell out for tickets for some of his many New York supporters, but he has set a modest budget for himself. He is adamant that he won’t let things get as far out of hand as they did for Rose, who had dozens of friends and family members come to each home game in Chicago.“His situation got out of control to where he was scrambling, trying to round up tickets right before games,” Noah said. “I definitely don’t wanna get like Derrick was.”Rose said he developed a nightly routine before Bulls’ home games: Get to the arena three hours before tipoff to work on his body; sit in hot and cold tubs; and assign tickets for his loved ones to pick up. (Some players — including Louisiana native Langston Galloway, who joined the Pelicans this past summer — say they hate the inconvenience of creating ticket lists before games, as it interrupts pregame routines such as watching film of that night’s opponent.)“I ended up just buying a box [at the United Center]. Had to get anywhere from eight to 10 tickets every night, plus a [suite] that held 16 people. Probably 26 to 30 tickets a game, for every single home game,” said Rose, describing a batch of tickets with a face value of six figures each season. “That’s crazy, right?”Asked whether the Bulls gave him extra tickets or the suite since he was a star and 2011 MVP, Rose, who’s earning $21 million this season, responded, “What do you think? I wish it had been like that. I had to pay for everything.”3Rose wouldn’t say how much, exactly, he used to spend in Chicago on tickets. The Bulls confirmed that they didn’t give Rose any free tickets or discounts.Playing for your hometown team isn’t all ticket headaches; there’s plenty of upside, too.Howard, for instance, says he loves being able to enjoy regular Sunday dinners with his family. Bucks forward Steve Novak said that because he grew up an hour from Milwaukee and knew the city well before he signed there, he faces fewer potential distractions from basketball. And Wade said his ticket distribution has surprisingly become easier since signing with the Bulls.“When I used to come back to Chicago, it was always really hectic, because my family could only see me play in person once or twice a year. So for those games, I’d get about 50 tickets for my family. And that’s serious money,” said Wade, who added that he later vowed to never spend so much on tickets again. “Now I play here 41 times a year. So I can lower the number of tickets for each game and spread things out over the whole season. And it’s much easier.”Players said veterans generally are better about standing firm on money than their younger teammates. Many hire staff to help handle their ticket-distribution responsibilities so as not to hinder their game-to-game focus.Haslem said he used to buy 20 or more tickets for every home game — like Rose in Chicago — but began managing his finances better about six years into his career, when he put his stepmother in charge of his tickets.“I appointed her as my head of ticket sales, because she just tells everybody to go to hell. She don’t care,” Haslem said. “She tells people, ‘You ain’t been there with him since the beginning, so you ain’t coming to his games!’ ”Some players find that a good, old-fashioned guilt trip is the most effective way to get people to stop asking for tickets: Make them aware of how much the extra seats cost, and most people will think twice before requesting more.“With a lot of them, I don’t think they know that we have to pay for those extra tickets,” says Knicks forward and Brooklyn native Lance Thomas, who, until last season, never had a guaranteed contract and was careful with his money. “So I make sure to let them know afterwards, so it doesn’t become a habit.” Quincy AcyDallas Veteran players who joined a team within 100 miles of their birthplace this season After being traded from Chicago to New York this past summer, Derrick Rose was elated when free agent center Joakim Noah, his close friend and ex-Bulls teammate, signed with the Knicks. But Rose, who had played in his hometown of Chicago for eight years, had a piece of advice for Noah now that he’d be playing for a team a mile from where he grew up.“I just told him to be careful,” Rose said, after congratulating Noah, “because everybody’s going to ask you for tickets, and the demand is about to be crazy.”Noah is far from the only guy who’s getting a brisk education in what it’s like to play at home 41 times a year. An unprecedented number of NBA veterans signed with their hometown teams this past summer, and many of them are encountering an awkward predicament: What to do with all these seemingly random junior-high classmates who blitz them with ticket requests?According to the Elias Sports Bureau, 122 NBA veterans switched teams this past summer. Of that group, 10 — or 8 percent — joined a club within 100 miles of their birthplace, according to an analysis run by David Corby of Basketball-Reference.com at FiveThirtyEight’s request.1There’s no way of consistently defining NBA players’ hometowns that would work for every case. The definition we used generally identifies players most fans would consider to have returned to their hometown, but there are exceptions. For example, Dallas-area native Deron Williams’s 2015 signing with the Mavericks isn’t counted since he was born in West Virginia.Meanwhile, when there is more than one team within 100 miles of a player’s birthplace, he might be counted when joining a team that isn’t the closest to his hometown — even when he was previously playing for a team that’s closer. For instance, our analysis includes the trade that sent Philadelphia native Marc Jackson from the 76ers to the New Jersey Nets before the 2005-06 season. Distance between a player’s birthplace and his team was calculated as the crow flies. That’s the highest number of veteran players to make their way home during a single offseason since 1988, the year unrestricted free agency took root in the NBA, and more than triple the average annual number.2Basketball-Reference.com’s analysis counted players in the year they moved to their hometown teams. For consistency, that was considered the year before the season ended, even in the case of the season after the 1998-1999 lockout, which both started and ended in 1999; transactions before that season are counted in our analysis as 1998. The analysis excludes rookies and veterans with fewer than five career win shares as of Jan. 30, as well as players who were acquired by their hometown teams but never appeared on the roster during the season. PLAYERTEAM JOINED Jeff TeagueIndiana Langston GallowayNew Orleans Randy FoyeBrooklyn Dwyane WadeChicago Cole AldrichMinnesota Joakim NoahNew York Dwight HowardAtlanta Gerald HendersonPhiladelphia Excludes players with fewer than five career win shares as of Jan. 30, as well as players who were acquired by their hometown teams but haven’t appeared on the roster during the season. Players listed in descending order of win shares. It’s unclear what caused the spike in players going home this past summer. It might have been a fluke. But perhaps LeBron James’s decision to return to Cleveland in 2014 for a second stint with the Cavaliers, 30 miles from his hometown of Akron, Ohio, influenced more players to consider the possibility.“I think that’s definitely had an impact,” said Miami native Udonis Haslem, who has spent his entire NBA career with the Heat and watched ex-teammates James and Dwyane Wade leave South Beach to go back home to Cleveland and Chicago, respectively. “There’s nothing like playing for the team you grew up watching as a kid. You can’t replace that.”That sense of home initially appealed to 2015 All-Star Jeff Teague, who was thrilled to be traded from Atlanta to play for his hometown Indiana Pacers in June. (The three-team swap — which sent George Hill, also an Indianapolis native, away from his hometown club — was the only trade to bring a veteran back to his hometown last offseason. The other nine players making a return trip all signed as free agents.)Teague, a point guard with a mural of Indianapolis tattoos on his left arm, says he prioritizes his family; after the trade he moved into the basement of the house he bought for his parents. But as much as he loves being around his folks, the 28-year-old said in an interview that playing at home “is definitely not what I expected” so far. It’s been challenging to deal with so many people coming out of the woodwork to ask him for tickets, Teague said.“Honestly, it’s a lot easier playing in a place where you don’t know anyone, because no one really bothers you,” said Teague. “At home, everybody knows you. People ask for everything. And I try to tell them, ‘Talk to my parents,’ or just turn them down. But it’s hard to say no. Sometimes I just end up giving into it.”Requests, some of them from family friends he doesn’t know, weigh on Teague. “I end up having to buy and buy and buy, because there’s no way around it,” he said. “It’s not cheap, and it’s definitely not ideal.”Generally speaking, NBA teams allow their players to give out three complimentary tickets for home games, and two free tickets for road contests. But some teams handle their distribution differently, according to interviews with two dozen players in NBA locker rooms. A few clubs offer better seats than others, and in a handful of smaller markets — where sellouts are rarer — teams are occasionally more flexible in letting players have extra tickets.When players need more than their own allotment of free tickets, they do have options. The most common solution is to borrow a teammate’s seats that night, then return the favor later in the season, whenever the club visits that teammate’s hometown.“That usually works. But it can get a little hairy if you don’t ask people far enough in advance,” said Cole Aldrich, who grew up near Minneapolis and signed to play for the Timberwolves this past summer. He recalled a preseason game in Kansas City, Missouri, that led to a ticket rush between him and teammates Andrew Wiggins and Brandon Rush, who “were all fighting over our teammates’ extras right up until the game,” Aldrich said. (High ticket demand can extend beyond players’ hometowns: Aldrich, Wiggins and Rush starred at Kansas in college.)Players can often buy additional tickets if they run out of their own and can’t get any from teammates. But not everyone is willing to pay for acquaintances and distant relatives to attend games for free.“I bought my parents courtside seats, and I got a suite for my kids. Other than that, people are grown and there’s this thing called Ticketmaster that they can use,” said Dwight Howard, the Atlanta native who in July signed with the Hawks. “Everybody knew I was gonna handle it that way, because I sat down with them in advance and told them I’m not spending extra money on things like that.” read more

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TURKS AND CAICOS ON TOP IN CARIBBEAN HIGH SCHOOL EXAM RESULTS —

first_img Hurricane Hit Territories Labelled “Too Wealthy” for British Aid Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 25 Oct 2014 – Among the 411 students on the CXC Top 10 Regional Merit List in 35 subjects are 2 Turks and Caicos Islanders. This list is a recognition of students ranking 1 – 10 in each subject. Natalia Williams, daughter of Rhoda and Rupert Williams and past student of HJRHS ranked 10th in Food and Nutrition; while former MBHS student, Krischan Cox, son of District Commissioner (South Caicos), Yvette Cox and MBHS Vice Principal, Rodney Cox, ranked 7th in Building Technology (Woods). Congratulations to these two students, their teachers and their parents. Former US President Barack Obama Visits Turks and Caicos Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:cxc, top, turks and caicos Recommended for you Crown Land Motion by PDM demands better processlast_img read more

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