The Cardiff City v QPR quiz

first_imgQPR face Cardiff City later this afternoon. How much do you know about the history involving the two clubs? Test your knowledge by seeing how many of the 10 questions below you can answer correctly. See also:QPR youngsters make winning startQPR’s promotion odds cut – and punters fancy them against CardiffQPR plan to approach Chery about new contractQPR face first away testQPR’s Lynch likely to be out for two weeksVideo: Watch highlights of QPR’s win at Cardiff CityFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Read more on The Cardiff City v QPR quiz

Sierra spoils Corsairs home opener

first_imgMcKinleyville >> The College of the Redwoods softball team dropped both games of a doubleheader to 8th-ranked Sierra College on Saturday at McKinleyville High School.Despite two home runs from freshman first baseman Courtney Christensen and a solo dinger from catcher Calli Hayes, CR dropped the first game of the twin bill 8-3 to Sierra College.All three Corsair home runs were off the solo variety.CR was down by just one run at 4-3 late in the game, but Sierra’s first four batters scored in …last_img read more

Read more on Sierra spoils Corsairs home opener

‘Hard Knocks’ awards: Antonio Brown delivers tour-de-force performance

first_imgAntonio Brown dominated Episode 3 of “Hard Knocks” just like he ruled the NFL world’s headlines all week.The mercurial Raiders receiver was the thread that tied Tuesday’s episode together.At the outset, the Raiders were waiting on him to return to their training camp, and just before the end came general manager Mike Mayock’s now-famous ultimatum directed toward Brown.In between, he charmed his teammates and coaches, the NFL Films cameras particularly trained on head coach Jon Gruden. …last_img read more

Read more on ‘Hard Knocks’ awards: Antonio Brown delivers tour-de-force performance

Anti-Creation Rhetoric Lacks Creativity

first_img(Visited 36 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 One would think, after so many decades, the secular scientists would come up with some original arguments for combating their favorite nemesis, the creationists.The secular scientists (especially the Darwinian evolutionists) never tire of the same talking points against anyone who expresses doubts about evolution (to them, intelligent design is no different from young-earth Biblical creationism, so the term “creationist” lumps many disparate views together).  The basic complaints are: (1) creation (or design) is religion and is at war with science (the old “warfare hypothesis”); (2) the scientific method is the path to truth, enlightenment and progress (i.e., scientism or logical positivism); (3) disbelievers in evolution (or the consensus) are scientifically illiterate.  Skeptics of man-made global warming have been getting the same rap for several years now.Propping up these old ideas are a few more notions that are sometimes stated, sometimes assumed: (4) to maintain its leadership in the world, America must hold back the inroads of  creationists (or skeptics of the consensus) who are trying to insert religion or pseudoscience into school science classes; (5) science and religion are completely separate human activities that do not overlap; and (6) all sciences are equally valid (e.g., astrophysics, psychology, and SETI); (7) “science” and “scientific consensus” are essentially synonymous.Cosmos ConsensusSecular scientists prefer airing these talking points without giving their opponents chances to respond.  A good example is an exclusive video interview with Neil deGrasse Tyson (star of the new Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey TV series) on National Geographic that the editors seem to promote as a sermon: “All with the thoughtful charm that has made him a star. Take a listen,” the web page exhorts.  In his charming way, with passionate gestures, Tyson touches on several of the talking points [see commentary below for rebuttal]:“The real problem in society is not whether we’re teaching our kids enough science.  Because— let’s say we started that tomorrow: does that mean everything is OK?  If we teach the 13-year-old better STEM education [science, technology, engineering, mathematics], a better STEM teacher, am I going to wait 40 years for that kid to become president or a member of Congress so that we have a scientifically literate country?  No; I’m not that patient.  For me, the real challenge—the real problem are scientifically illiterate adults.  Adults are in charge.  There are five times as many adults as there are kids in this country.  Adults wield resources.  Adults vote.  Don’t tell me “Fix the kids, and everything will be fine.”  Fix the adults! then the kids will be fine…. [Because of Carl Sagan having popularized science to the public], members of science came to embrace the methods and tools of science and the fruits of its discovery.If you feel strongly about your religious philosophies, I will have nothing to say about that – unless you want to change the curriculum in a science classroom.  And I would ask you—I won’t fight you, I will ask you—”Why?  There’s no tradition of scientists knocking down the Sunday School door, telling the preacher what to teach.”  That is never— atheists don’t even do that.  There’s no scientist or atheist picketing outside of your church (or synagogue or mosque), saying “That might not necessarily be true!”  There is no such tradition.  So what is the motivation to try to take a religious philosophy and influence what goes on in science?  You can get up enough people to influence school boards. OK.  Again, I’m an educator, so I’m here to tell you the consequences of that.  If you substitute religious philosophy for science [gestures that these are separate realms], there’ll be a generation of people who will not understand what science is.  And they will be [with emphasis] intellectually crippled to contributing to what the centuries have demonstrated to be the most efficient engine of economic growth that has ever been devised.  And that is innovations in science and technology.Viewers of his Cosmos TV series might recall many instances of Tyson going far afield the “methods and tools of science” to express his own philosophy—especially big-bang-to-man evolution—using cartoons, inaccurate historical episodes and quite unscientific animations.  The 13th and final episode airs tonight (June 8), but the whole series will most certainly be aired and re-aired, and can be watched on the Cosmos On TV website (find some rebuttals on Evolution News & Views).  Many teachers have expressed plans to show the series in science classes.Incidentally, Tyson told Nature that the whole show was scripted.  He had to learn to deliver the words like an actor does, but was following a predetermined script, not extemporaneously speaking, although he most likely agreed with everything in the script.  The influence of Carl Sagan’s wife Ann Druyan was most likely ever-present.Consensus CensusAfter describing results of a recent poll that (shockingly!) found that “4 in 10 Americans Believe God Created Earth 10,000 Years Ago,” Live Science writer Tia Ghose let her personal bias show through:Knowledge keyMost of the people who believed in evolution also said they were knowledgeable about the theory, whereas those who said they were not too familiar with the theory also were less likely to believe in it.Americans’ belief in creationism is at odds with scientific consensus. Almost all scientists who study human origins believe that we evolved from other life-forms over millions of years. In fact, humans, or individuals in the genus Homo, are said to have emerged on Earth some 2.5 million years ago.Ghose creates a dichotomy in her readers’ minds that knowledgeable people believe evolution, but ignorant people don’t.  She failed to mention the many PhD creationists who dispute the neo-Darwinism and evolutionary time, calling on their specialities in many fields: geology, astronomy, history, philosophy and much more.Concerned ConsensusOn June 5, Live Science published an Op-Ed piece by Seth Shulman of the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS), entitled, “Top 5 Signs It’s Time to Stand Up for Science.”  He’s pumped, because “On too many occasions, politics and vested interests have trumped the solid scientific evidence people need to help make decisions at the state and federal level.”  He saved his biggest hit for last:5. Kentucky bankrolls creationismLast, but surely not least, is the recent decision by the Kentucky Tourism Development Finance Authority to grant more than $40 million in tax incentives for a planned $172 million expansion of the Bible-based Creation Museum that will feature a full-size replica of Noah’s ark and further the notion that dinosaurs and people roamed the earth simultaneously.Even aside from the issue of the separation of church and state, the move by the Kentucky government is a jaw-dropping affront to evolutionary science which has overwhelming evidence to show that the Creation Museum is off in its proposed depiction of when dinosaurs roamed by more than 60 million years.As former New York Democratic Sen. Daniel Moynihan famously put it years ago, people are entitled to their own opinions, but they’re not entitled to their own facts. Want your representatives to make better decisions? Let them hear from you by standing up for science.Shulman fails to notice that the tax incentives will more than be covered by increased tax revenues for the privately-funded project, so the state is not “bankrolling” AIG’s project; it is treating this private organization the same way it would treat any other.  The First Amendment cannot deny the free exercise of religion, so it cannot deny AIG treatment available to other organizations.  If his issue of “separation of church and state” were accurate, no churches or their rescue missions, soup kitchens or other religious ministries would qualify as non-profit religious organizations.  The whole point of AIG’s project is to present scientific evidence; why is it so “jaw-dropping” to allow people to hear alternatives to the consensus, when no one is forced to visit the museum?  Students at public schools only get to hear evidence supporting Darwinism.In summary, an observer might feel himself in a flashback, listening to tirades against creationism from Huxley, Tyndall or Darrow, given the similarity in talking points.  Perhaps that stasis could be adduced by creationists as a falsification of intellectual evolution.As is our custom (contrary to the practice of our opponents), we always let evolutionists give their best shot before analyzing their evidence and arguments.  Go ahead; if you think our quotes are selective, you have the links—read the whole articles.  Watch the whole Cosmos TV series.  Be our guest.  We feel like Darwin on this matter of discernment: “A fair result can be obtained only by fully stating and balancing the facts and arguments on both sides of each question.”  (Keep in mind we might agree on some things they say.)  So have at it.  Then come back and look for our commentary.  Do a little investigation by yourself first, though: consult our Baloney Detector alongside their material, and ask: any propaganda?  any big lies?  any half-truths?  glittering generalities?  straw men?  sidestepping?  fear-mongering?  loaded words?  Here’s our analysis of Tyson’s quotation.“The real problem in society is not whether we’re teaching our kids enough science. Because— let’s say we started that tomorrow: does that mean everything is OK? If we teach the 13-year-old better STEM education [science, technology, engineering, mathematics], a better STEM teacher, am I going to wait 40 years for that kid to become president or a member of Congress so that we have a scientifically literate country? [Association Fallacy; because Tyson presented evolution as science throughout Cosmos, he is associating Darwinism with scientific literacy.] No; I’m not that patient. For me, the real challenge—the real problem are scientifically illiterate adults. Adults are in charge. There are five times as many adults as there are kids in this country. Adults wield resources. Adults vote. Don’t tell me “Fix the kids, and everything will be fine.” Fix the adults! [Tyson ridicules his opponents as people who need fixing, and assumes that conforming to the consensus on global warming and evolution will “fix” them, even if they have sound evidence for their views.]  then the kids will be fine…. [Because of Carl Sagan having popularized science to the public], members of science came to embrace the methods and tools of science and the fruits of its discovery. [Tyson forgets that each science has its own methods and tools, some more valid than others.  He also forgets that scientific discoveries are often overturned later, sometimes decades later.]If you feel strongly about your religious philosophies [Tyson fails to recognize the philosophical and religious underpinnings of science], I will have nothing to say about that – unless you want to change the curriculum in a science classroom [Presents the false dichotomy of religion vs science, and the warfare hypothesis; knocks down a straw man]. And I would ask you—I won’t fight you, I will ask you—”Why? There’s no tradition of scientists knocking down the Sunday School door, telling the preacher what to teach.” [This is the either-or fallacy again.  Tyson presents people with “religious philosophies” as separate from scientists, forgetting that most early scientists—and many today—are highly religious, and find their justification for their science in their religion.]  That is never— atheists don’t even do that.  There’s no scientist or atheist picketing outside of your church (or synagogue or mosque), saying “That might not necessarily be true!”  There is no such tradition.  [Sad fact is, some do.  The NCSE has created Sunday School material for churches to try to ease their acceptance of Darwinian evolution.  Some atheists picket churches.  Some attack specific Christian beliefs on billboards.  So this is a half truth or perhaps even a big lie.]  So what is the motivation to try to take a religious philosophy and influence what goes on in science?  [But Darwinism is a religious philosophy, as is the atheism Tyson espouses.  Those conservatives who take action at school board meetings are not trying to get religion taught in science class; they are trying to decrease the rampant religious indoctrination of Darwinism from science, and promote what science should be all about: testable science, not indoctrination.  It shouldn’t matter what the religious beliefs are of a person who advocates for accurate science in textbooks and curricula; what should matter is the evidence that bad science is being presented.  Tyson ought to join them in getting Haeckel’s embryos out of textbooks, for instance.]  You can get up enough people to influence school boards. OK. Again, I’m an educator, so I’m here to tell you the consequences of that.  If you substitute religious philosophy for science [more of the either-or fallacy], there’ll be a generation of people who will not understand what science is [massive glittering generality]. And they will be intellectually crippled [more ridicule: calling anyone who disagrees with Darwinism an intellectual cripple] to contributing to what the centuries have demonstrated to be the most efficient engine of economic growth that has ever been devised [half truth: true for Faraday and Maxwell (both Christians), but not for Darwin, who delayed progress in some major discoveries (e.g., vestigial organs, junk DNA, simplistic just-so stories)].  And that is innovations in science and technology.  [In addition to more false dichotomy, Tyson uses fear-mongering, glittering generalities and association.  Teaching evolution honestly (the goal of the Discovery Institute and other advocates of academic freedom) has nothing to do with innovations in science and technology.  Look at the biomimetics revolution for a design-based science that is on the cutting edge of innovation.]Our readers may find additional propaganda tactics, logical fallacies and smokescreens in this and other anti-creationist rhetoric quoted above.last_img read more

Read more on Anti-Creation Rhetoric Lacks Creativity

‘Kingmaker’ Dushyant Chautala to meet JJP MLAs on Friday

first_imgJannayak Janta Party (JJP) leader Dushyant Chautala, who has emerged as kingmaker in Haryana, will be meeting his 10 legislators in Delhi on Friday to decide which party to support in order to form the next government in the state, sources said on Thursday. The Haryana Assembly poll verdict threw up a fractured mandate with the Congress winning 31 of the 90 seats at stake and the BJP bagging 40 seats. The half-way mark is 46. Though Mr. Chautala has remained non-committal on whether his party would support the BJP or the Congress, party sources said that he is likely to meet Union Home Minister and BJP chief Amit Shah soon. Sources also said that the BJP too would like to have him onboard and make him an equal stakeholder in the state government as it would help reduce dependence on Independents, even though many of them are BJP rebels. The BJP was weighing its options, sources in the saffron party said.The Bharatiya Janata Party, which formed its first ever government in the state on its own in 2014, needs support this time to come to retain power. In this scenario, role of both Independents and JJP is crucial. With 31 seats, the Congress will need the support of the JJP as well as seven Independents to come to power which looks like an uphill task. Earlier in the day, Mr .Chautala while commenting on the trends which were available at that time had said, “This shows there was huge anti-incumbency against the (Manohar Lal) Khattar government.” But when asked whether his party will support the BJP or the Congress, Chautala remained non-committal.“It is too early to say anything. We will first summon a meeting of our MLAs, decide who would be our leader in the House and then take it further,” he told reporters.“People of Haryana want change,” he added. Notably, Mr. Chautala had floated the JJP in December last year after a vertical split in the Indian National Lok Dal (INLD) following a feud in the Chautala clan.The INLD was decimated in the polls and could manage to win only one seat.last_img read more

Read more on ‘Kingmaker’ Dushyant Chautala to meet JJP MLAs on Friday

I still have a lot to contribute to the team: Ponting

first_imgAustralian skipper Ricky Ponting.Is Ricky Ponting preparing for a life after cricket? A categorical “no” was the answer the Australian skipper gave to former Indian captain Sourav Ganguly on Headlines Today programme Captain’s Corner on Friday, a day after India ended his team’s 12-year reign as the world champions. “I have sort of made my intentions already clear. There has been a lot of speculation. There have been a lot of questions from home as well. Some reports claim I’m going to retire. I’m not going to do that. I want to play. I think I still have a lot to contribute to the Australian team,” Ponting said. “We’ve got few days at home now before we go to Bangladesh. I have time to think and reflect and talk to people in Cricket Australia about what ideas I have about the future of Australian cricket,” he added talking about his future plans. No to IPLPonting ruled out an Indian Premier League (IPL) stint. “Probably not,” he replied when questioned about his plans to join the cash-rich league. But he would most likely not feature in another World Cup. “Four years, right now the way things have gone for me in the past week, is a long-long time. I was asked this yesterday, if this was my last World Cup. Well, most likely it is. I’m 36 right now and I will be 40 by that time. There are not many guys who play at that age. But if that was my last innings in the World Cup, it’s not a bad way to finish.” Defeat in AhmedabadadvertisementPonting was the pick of Australian batting line up at Motera scoring 104 in 118 balls on Thursday, but he said that it was an overall performance by India that did the Aussies in. Asked if he was miles ahead in terms of class than rest of his team in the Motera clash, Ponting said: “I was (good) yesterday, but I have not been for the majority of the tournament. Watson, Hayden and Clarke have our best batsmen in the tournament. I have always backed myself to perform in big games. It’s good I made all those runs. But I would have happily given away all of those runs to have Australia win the game.” But did he find a huge difference in India of the yore and the band he took on yesterday? “It’s always a good contest against India. This team is well focused. They’re driven and want to become the best in all three forms of the game. I also feel it’s a very close group of players. When you have that sort of feeling in the dressing room, that goes a long way in winning big games. Quality of the players has always been there. Now there’s experience and you have young talent like Kohli and Raina,” he replied. Hails YuvrajThe Aussie’s accolades, however, were reserved for Yuvraj Singh. “He’s been very focused throughout the tournament. Even with the ball, he’s been very effective. He’s a stand-out player. I think after being left out, that was some 12 months ago, he’s committed himself to being the best player he can. And no better place to do it than the World Cup.” India’s batting is the reason Ponting thinks the team can go the distance. His verdict was that Men in Blue would beat Pakistan in the mother of all battles to book a place in the finals. ‘India is a better side'”India has more class as far as batting is concerned. By the same token Pakistan has a better bowling attack. But I think over all India is a better side,” he said. Ponting contended that India had an edge since they had played more pressure games in the tournament compared to Pakistan. He put his money on an India-South Africa final to play out at Wankhede on April 2. “India will beat Pakistan. Sri Lanka will beat England. At the moment I’ll be picking an India-South Africa final. It’s difficult to pick who’ll win the final. Both teams deserve to be in the final. It’ll be a great game and may the best team of the day win,” Ponting said.last_img read more

Read more on I still have a lot to contribute to the team: Ponting