Reports on starvation deaths in Bengal are fabricated Mamata

first_imgKolkata: Days after news of alleged starvation deaths in West Bengal appeared in a section of the media, Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee on Tuesday refuted the reports as “fabricated”, saying the deaths either resulted from “age-related ailments” or “excessive liquor consumption”. Last week, media reports had suggested that seven people of Sabar community, in Jungle Mahal area of Jhargram district, died due to starvation. In her address to the Assembly, Banerjee said the state government provides foodgrain to “every poor person” in the state. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal life “The reports that people from Sabar community have died due to starvation is absolutely false and fabricated. No one has died in Bengal due to starvation. We provide free rice and wheat to each and every poor person in this state – from the hills in the north to Jungle Mahal in the south,” she stated. Sabar community is an ethnic tribe, mainly found in Jharkhand, Chhattisgarh, Madhya Pradesh and West Bengal. “People have died in Jungle Mahal due to excessive consumption of liquor or age-related ailments. While two people have died of illness and old age, others have died due to liver problems caused by excessive consumption of liquor,” she asserted. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killed Listing the development projects taken up for the welfare of tribal communities, the CM said the state has always been sensitive to the needs of the poor. Meanwhile, the legislators of opposition CPI(M) and the Congress staged a walkout from the assembly as their demand for a detailed discussion on alleged Sabar community deaths was rejected, following the chief minister’s unilateral statement on the issue. “The state government is afraid to hold a discussion, adhering to assembly rules, as it will unveil many secrets, giving us an opportunity to question the government. That is why the CM unilaterally gave a statement,” Leader of opposition Abdul Mannan said.last_img read more

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Happy Trails

first_img Renting software over the Web isn’t just for companies. Individuals who are on the road a lot and switch between different computers can now rent a so-called virtual desktop from Magically Inc. Its MagicalDesk service lets you store and view your important data files (any of 250 types for PC, Mac and Unix programs), calendar, schedule and to-do list, as well as send and receive e-mail–all using nothing more than your Web browser (as long as it supports JavaScript and frames) on any computer.Simply dial into the Web, and you’re at work. It also syncs up information with your desktop, laptop or PalmPilot, and allows others with the right password to view your files. An introductory no-frills service is available at no charge; the full service costs $5 per month with 20MB storage or $10 for 50MB. For more information, visit http://www.magicaldesk.comJohn Verity reported and edited for 10 years at Electronic News, Datamation and Business Week. Since 1997, he has been freelancing from his Brooklyn, New York, home. Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. August 17, 2006 Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. 1 min read Enroll Now for Freelast_img read more

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Buckle Up Googles SelfDriving Cars to Hit the Open Road

first_img Register Now » Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals 2 min read Today, self-driving cars are taking another step from 1984-esque daydream to mainstream, everyday, regular reality.  Starting this summer, Google’s autonomous vehicles will drive on the open roads in Mountain View, Calif., according to an announcement the company released today. Google has already had self-driving cars on the road for a while now, in partnership with Lexus. What’s hitting the public streets for the first time this summer are the vehicles that Google has built from the ground up, specifically for self-driving.The cars will only be driving around on public roads with a safety driver, who can take over operation of the vehicle in an emergency. Also, the cars will never go more than 25 mph, Google says.Related: Elon Musk: Human-Driven Cars Might Someday Be BannedTake a look. It’s for real.Google’s fleet of more than 20 self-driving cars has been zooming around test tracks for six years already, clocking 1.7 million miles, according to a post from earlier this week, written by Chris Urmson, director of Google’s self-driving car program. Of that 1.7 million miles, the cars have driven more than 1 million of the miles without a driver. Recently, the self-driving fleet has been averaging 10,000 self-driven miles per week, Urmson says.In the 6 years that Google has been testing its self-driving fleet, the autonomous vehicles have been in 11 accidents. None of those have been the fault of the self-driving cars, according to Google’s own Urmson.Related: This Is What It’s Like to Ride in a Driverless CarGoogle is convinced that self-driving cars are safer than ones with humans at-the-wheel. Google points to the statistic that driver error causes 94 percent of crashes, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.As Google brings its test fleet onto the city streets of Mountain View, it will be observing and researching how people interact with the autonomous vehicles as well as how the self-driving car technology manages situations when, say, the address it is supposed to arrive at is blocked or obstructed by traffic.Related: Driverless Cars Won’t Make Roadways Perfectly Safecenter_img May 15, 2015 Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right.last_img read more

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