UK court blocks US attempt to extradite Julian Assange, but leaves public interest reporting at risk

first_img News Follow the news on Europe – Central Asia January 4, 2021 UK court blocks US attempt to extradite Julian Assange, but leaves public interest reporting at risk US/UK : Julian Assange’s extradition hearing marred by barriers to open justice Receive email alerts November 26, 2020 Find out more Reporters Without Borders (RSF) is relieved by the 4 January decision of UK District Judge Vanessa Baraitser blocking the United States’ attempt to extradite Wikileaks publisher Julian Assange, but is extremely disappointed by the court’s failure to reject the substance of the case, leaving the door open to further prosecutions on similar grounds. October 9, 2020 Find out more January 1, 2021 Find out more Organisation Although Judge Baraitser decided against extradition, the grounds for her decision were strictly based on Assange’s serious mental health issues and the conditions he would face in detention in the US. On the substantive points in the case – in which the US government has pursued Assange on 17 counts under the Espionage Act and one count under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act – the judge’s decision was heavily in favour of the prosecution’s arguments, and dismissive of the defence.“We are immensely relieved that Julian Assange will not be extradited to the US. At the same time, we are extremely disappointed that the court failed to take a stand for press freedom and journalistic protections, and we disagree with the judge’s assessment that the case was not politically motivated and was not centred on journalism and free speech. This decision leaves the door open for further similar prosecutions and will have a chilling effect on national security reporting around the world if the root issues are not addressed,” said RSF’ Director of International Campaigns, Rebecca Vincent. The US government has indicated that it intends to appeal the extradition decision. Assange remains detained on remand in high-security Belmarsh prison, pending the judge’s consideration of his bail application on 6 January. RSF calls again for his immediate release, and will continue to monitor proceedings.Despite extensive difficulties securing access – including refusal by the judge to accredit NGO observers and threats of arrest by police on the scene – RSF monitored the 4 January hearing at London’s Central Criminal Court (the Old Bailey), and has been the only NGO to monitor the full extradition proceedings against Assange.The UK and US are respectively ranked 35th and 45th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2020 World Press Freedom Index. News Help by sharing this information RSF_en News to go further UK: RSF calls for Julian Assange’s urgent release as Covid infections rise at Belmarsh Prison US/UK: “Future of journalism” at stake as historic extradition decision looms in case of Julian Assange United KingdomUnited StatesEurope – Central AsiaAmericas ImprisonedFreedom of expressionJudicial harassment Reports United KingdomUnited StatesEurope – Central AsiaAmericas ImprisonedFreedom of expressionJudicial harassment last_img read more

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Corelation Conference: Don’t even try to compete with banks

first_imgHow can credit unions beat banks? By not even trying to compete with them.Three CEOs and a tech VP shared that advice and more during a breakout session Thursday morning at the Corelation User Conference at the San Diego Westin.“If credit unions look at themselves as niche players and stick to that, we can beat the big banks seven days a week,” said panelist Andy Jaeger, president/CEO of the $347 million Credit Union of New Jersey. “When we look at the broad landscape and try to do all these things everyone else is doing, we lose our focus. Where we’ve had success is when we stay true to our mission and focus, and and not stray to far outside that where we don’t do our best. The lesson is don’t try to emulate the competition.”Jaeger was joined on the panel by First Service Credit Union President/CEO David Bleazard, USC Credit Union CEO Gary Perez and Wescom Resources Group Vice President of IT Operations Linnie Gooch.Bleazard agreed with Jaeger, saying he gets excited when he is presented with new technology that his credit union could offer to members. However, discipline is key when making decisions regarding whether or not to pursue it.“Deciding what you’re not going to do is as important than what you are going to do,” he said. “It requires a lot of intestinal fortitude. If we try to be all things to all people, we’re not going to succeed.”Collaboration was another way the panel discussed as a means of competing with banks. When big banks like Bank of America have hundreds of millions of dollars budgeted annually to research and development, it’s the only way credit unions can keep up.However, collaboration isn’t easy, even for credit unions.“The ability to cooperate helps but as credit unions grow, as their field of memberships grow and it forces them to compete against each other, it gets harder to cooperate,” Bleazard said. “If we can pool our resources, it creates a tremendous opportunity to innovate, but there are challenges. Especially in the C-suite with lots of 10-gallon personalities wearing a 5-gallon hat.”Perez shared that his credit union was involved in forming a CUSO with other like-minded credit unions to do just that – collaborate to innovate. However, it disbanded after three years.“We found cooperating is hard because you lose control,” he said. “We had lots of committed idealists but nobody wanted to take the plunge.” 51SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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