Newspaper editor re-arrested just two days after he was released

first_img Organisation La Voix de Djibouti is not run by “opposition illiterates,” RSF says Receive email alerts August 4, 2020 Find out more Help by sharing this information News RSF_en June 7, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Newspaper editor re-arrested just two days after he was released News Djibouti: Detained reporter’s home searched, Facebook account hacked Reporters Without Borders has protested against the re-arrest of newspaper editor Daher Ahmed Farah on 5 June, just two days after his release, and has called on the authorities to set him free at once. The editor of the newspaper Le Renouveau and head of the Movement for Democratic Renewal and Development (MRD), Farah is the subject of several libel suits by the armed forces.”Although he was put back in custody for a different matter from the one for which he was released, we are outraged by this utterly unjustified decision,” Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Robert Ménard said in a letter to state prosecutor Djama Souleiman Ali.”Farah was just exercising his right to inform the public, a right guaranteed by several international treaties ratified by the Republic of Djibouti,” Ménard saidHe referred in his letter to the opinion of Stéphane Zerbib, an international lawyer engaged by Reporters Without Borders to defend Farah because no lawyer in Djibouti was willing. Zerbib said Farah’s re-arrest was all the more unjustified as Gen. Zakaria Cheik Ibrahim, the army chief of staff had offered to withdraw his lawsuit in return for a letter of apology. Farah declined, but if he could have avoided prosecution by means of a mere apology, imprisonment seemed even more disproportionate to the wrong Gen. Zakaria claimed to have suffered.Ménard also reminded the state prosecutor that the United Nations condemns imprisonment for the peaceful expression of an opinion and views it as a serious violation of human rights.On 28 May, the appeal court reduced the sentence that had been passed on 7 April in one of Gen. Zakaria’s libel suits against Farah, over an article on 6 March accusing the army high command of carrying out politically-motivated dismissals. But it passed what is still a very heavy sentence for a press crime, namely a four-month suspended prison sentence and 500,000 Djibouti francs (2,417 euros) in damages. The original sentence was a six-month suspended prison sentence, a fine of 200,000 Djibouti francs (1,000 euros) and 2 million Djibouti francs (10,000 euros) in damages. Le Renouveau criticised the army again on 17 April, accusing it of lacking “neutrality” and saying it “should be apolitical.” As a result, Farah was arrested three days later but he requested a provisional release and this was finally granted by the investigating judge on 3 June. The prosecutor appealed against the release, obtaining an order for Farah’s re-arrest. This was carried out on the morning of 5 June by criminal investigation and special affairs police who detained him at his mother’s home, where he had just passed the night. They took him to Gabode prison where he had been held before in appalling conditions.Farah has also been prosecuted for “undermining the army’s morale” as a result of a complaint by another general and the defence ministry. His appeal against the six-month suspended prison sentence and fine of 200,000 Djibouti francs in this case has not yet been heard.He was detained several times in the past few years. In most cases, he was prosecuted for press offences and sentenced to prison terms or fines. to go further July 17, 2020 Find out more Follow the news on Djibouti DjiboutiAfrica News December 9, 2020 Find out more Another Voix de Djibouti reporter arrested in Djibouti City DjiboutiAfrica Reporters Without Borders has protested against the re-arrest of newspaper editor Daher Ahmed Farah on 5 June, just two days after his release, and has called on the authorities to set him free at once. The editor of the newspaper Le Renouveau and head of the Movement for Democratic Renewal and Development (MRD), Farah is the subject of several libel suits by the armed forces. Newslast_img read more

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The Best Shows on BBC that are not Downtown Abbey

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York By Lissa HarrisThe BBC has always put together some amazing programming. As the world’s oldest national broadcasting organization, BBC has continuously provided high quality (and low quality) programming to the world on the dime of the average British household and I personally want to thank each and every one of those contributors for hours and hours of pure personal enjoyment. Here is my list of the top shows, most of which can be found on non-nefarious Netflix.The Catherine Tate Show:Catherine Tate is a comedienne known in the States for her portrayal of Nellie Bertram, Michael Scott’s replacement, in the eight and ninth seasons of NBC’s The Office. But her talents are truly showcased in the sketch comedy show that bears her name. Her range of character is incredible and hilarious. My favorite character is Margaret the frightened woman who screams in terror at seemingly innocuous noises such as crunching or her own hiccups. If you think this is funny, you will LOVE this comedy.LutherThe current popularity of the crime drama has me on cloud nine and renews my faith in humanity’s capability to be interested in anything other than a housewife of some county. Like it’s title character played by Idris Alba, Luther has it all: intelligence, suspense, and sharp dialogue most of which is spoken in cockneyed british accents. It exudes a sexy slumpiness that is irresistible and completely satifying right down to the opening song by Massive Attack.Its only flaw is falling prey to the all too familiar “shock” plot twist (ie: killing off a major character) that we see all too often in TV today. But I can forgive its transgression without impunity because everything else about it is so good.Call the MidwifeI happened upon this pink diamond after reading an article about the best shows on Netflix. I was skeptical at first since, on the surface, it possessed none of my usual desired traits for good TV (crime-based, apocalypse centered, or anything sci-fi). It is set in 1950s London in the poverty stricken Eastend and follows the life of novice mid-wife in a convent, Nurse Jenny Lee (played by Jessica Raines). Each episode focuses on a different pregnant women with her own unique set of concerns for herself, her family, and her unborn baby. The show emphasis is on how crucial the midwife was at a time before we gave birth in hospitals strapped to a fetal monitor, a heart monitor, and an IV drip filled with Pitocin. It was surely a simpler time but boy did things go wrong. And although they faced some hard decisions, everything always turned out right in the end except for that one episode that unlike Luther I will never forgive them for. And let us not forget Nurse Camilla “Chummy” Browne, played with wild abandon by Miranda Hart, who at six-foot-something is awkward nervous perfection.SherlockOkay, okay I know. Sherlock is hardly a hidden gem. It is about as popular as that show I mentioned in the title (Downton Abbey, shhhhhh). But unless you have watched this series, every episode, more than once, you don’t know Sherlock. Visually stunning shot for shot, this show should be watched again in slow motion just to be able to absorb the slight nuances of the cinematography and each character’s movements within. Then it should be watched by pausing during breaks in the dialogue in order to catch each line in its “blink and you’ll miss it” style. Sherlock is a veritable banquet for the eyes, brain, and soul. Benedict Cumberbatch (Sherlock Holmes) and Martin Freeman (Dr. Watson) have a chemistry on screen that rivals Bogey and Bacall. The storylines are as realistic, intelligent and well though out as (or dare I say even better than) Breaking Bad, and this last season’s finale was exhausting and glorious to watch. It took my mind a week to recover. If you get nothing from this article except that I think everyone should WATCH THIS SHOW, then this was worth the hour it took me to write and I can feel that I’ve done my part to remove the stigma that still surrounds television. Sherlock is the reason why TV is good, TV is right, and TV should be watched often with a discriminating and curious mind. We will all be better for it.last_img read more

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DR Congo’s electoral commission chief’s resignation sparks concern

first_imgAbbott Apollinaire Malu-Malu, pictured on January 11, 2013, submitted his resignation as chief of the independent national electoral commission, triggering concern among opposition ranks (AFP Photo/Isaac Kasamani) Abbott Apollinaire Malu-Malu, pictured on January 11, 2013, submitted his resignation as chief of the independent national electoral commission, triggering concern among opposition ranks (AFP Photo/Isaac Kasamani)The surprise resignation of the Democratic Republic of Congo’s electoral commission chief, announced Saturday on television, triggered concern among opposition ranks that President Joseph Kabila may be looking to postpone a critical vote due next year.Mr Abbott Apollinaire Malu-Malu submitted his resignation as chief of the independent national electoral commission (Ceni) for health reasons, according to a statement carried by state television.The resignation comes amid heated tensions in DR Congo over presidential and parliamentary elections due in November 2016, with Kabila’s foes arguing he is seeking to hold on to power illegitimately.The constitution bars him from seeking a third elected five-year term at the end of his mandate late next year, but he has yet to comply with opposition demands to publicly state that he will not to run again.CENI, which is tasked with organising the sensitive elections, brings together figures from across DR Congo’s political landscape.President Kabila, who came to power in wartime in 2001, has asked Congolese civil society to appoint Mr Malu-Malu’s replacement.Mr Olivier Kamitatu, a member of a group of seven parties known as DR Congo’s G7 that recently switched to the opposition, described the resignation as “a new stroke of lightning in (DR Congo’s political) landscape”.Samy Badibanga, who heads the main opposition alliance in parliament, showed little surprise however over the resignation.Mr Malu-Malu was being treated abroad for an undisclosed disease, and had been mostly absent from public view for months.While it appears the CENI chief really was unwell, “everything seems to indicate that (the government) wants to gain time” ahead of the slated polls, Badibanga said.“Malu-Malu was CENI’s most qualified expert,” he added, crediting him for the work he did during the 2006 election — DR Congo’s first free poll since the country’s independence in 1960. The resignation “will complicate things” in the countdown to next year’s polls, Mr Badibanga warned.DR Congo has been marred by political tension since President Kabila’s contested re-election in 2011. None of the votes that were scheduled to be held since then have gone ahead.last_img read more

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