Interprofessional Cancer Education in South Shore Health

first_imgImproved patient care is at the heart of a project designed to train cancer health professionals to provide cancer education to their peers. Funded by Health Canada, with Cancer Care Nova Scotia as the project lead, Partners for Interprofessional Cancer Education has trained one health professional from South Shore Health as a facilitator. The training provides expertise in interprofessional learning – a greater appreciation of each others’ values, knowledge and abilities; collaborative, patient-centred practice and cultural sensitivity and safety for First Nations communities. This facilitator will educate health professionals in their district. Together with 37 other facilitators from across Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, they will reach more than 1,100 community-based health professionals over the next year. “Canada’s government commends Cancer Care Nova Scotia and itspartners for their leadership in this project. By April 2008, more than 1,000 Nova Scotian health professionals will be better trained to help cancer patients,” said Tony Clement, federal Minister of Health. “The introduction of interprofessional education across Nova Scotia will benefit not only the patients who will receive unprecedented treatment and support, but also the teams of professionals who work in cancer care.” “With the expertise and commitment of districts, and the strength of our other partners, we are extending the value and reach of Cancer Care Nova Scotia’s original interprofessional education program, the interprofessional core curriculum,” said Theresa Marie Underhill, chief operating officer, Cancer Care Nova Scotia. “Through this project, we are enhancing it, extending the training of health professionals and providing the necessary supports for them to deliver the interprofessional core curriculum to others.” “Health-care providers are excited about the opportunity to broaden and enhance their knowledge, skills and understanding through this initiative. We are pleased to be working with our partners to provide education that will positively impact the lives of hundreds of cancer patients in our District,” said South Shore Health’s CEO Kevin McNamara. Health professionals with an expertise in cancer or palliative care were recruited to participate in the training. Medical and radiation oncologists, palliative care physicians and nurses, social workers, pharmacists, nursing students from St. Francis Xavier University and First Nations representatives working in health were among those trained. “Cancer Care Nova Scotia and its partners have produced an extraordinary education resource,” said Dr. David Abriel, physician on South Shore Health’s palliative care team, who was recently trained as an interprofessional facilitator. “In addition, the recent workshops have provided training not only in the presentation of content, but also in facilitating healthprofessionals who are establishing a new patient-centred and morecollaborative model of care.” The Registered Nurses Professional Development Centre, in collaboration with other partners, implemented the first phase of the project, the development of the facilitator training program. First Nations consultants worked with the Registered Nurses Professional Development Centre to ensure cultural safety and sensitivity was woven throughout the training program. The centre also revised the case studies included in Cancer Care Nova Scotia’s interprofessional core curriculum, which facilitators will be delivering. Beginning in April, facilitators will deliver the core curriculumprogram to community based health professionals in Nova Scotia and P.E.I. The curriculum has 10 modules including, pain and symptom management, treatment and side effects. By April 2008, 1,100 health professionals will have a better knowledge in these areas as well as an improved understanding and appreciation of the expertise of their team members and the community resources available to patients and families. The curriculum will also be included in the undergraduate nursing program at St. Francis Xavier University. As part of the project, Cancer Care Nova Scotia will help facilitators develop a community of practice to build interprofessional knowledge and expertise through better interaction. An evaluation, led by Dalhousie Continuing Medical Education, for both facilitators and participants will cover both intended and self reported changes in practice. Possible ways for evaluating the project from the patient perspective are also being discussed. In addition to Cancer Care Nova Scotia, Partners for Interprofessional Cancer Education includes: district health authorities, the IWK Health Centre, the Registered Nurses Professional Development Centre, Dalhousie University Continuing Medical Education, Dalhousie University College of Pharmacy, Division of Continuing Pharmacy Education, the Union of NovaScotia Indians, the Confederacy of Mainland Mi’kmaq, St. Francis Xavier School of Nursing, Seniors’ Secretariat and Prince Edward Island Department of Health. Cancer Care Nova Scotia is a program of the Department of Health,created to reduce the burden of cancer on individuals, families, and the health care system through prevention, screening, education and research.last_img read more

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Video to promote Gaur Purnima festival

first_imgKolkata: The state Tourism department has for the first time partnered with International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON) and made a video to highlight the Gaur Purnima festival at Mayapur, its global headquarters.The five-minute video on Gaur Purnima, to observe the birth of Sri Chaitanya, has been shown in all the festivals where the state Tourism department participates, said a senior official of the department. His Divine Grace AC Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupad, founder Acharya of ISKCON and the first Indian saint who spread Gaudiya Vaishnava philosophy successfully in the West in 1960. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari PujaChief Minister Mamata Banerjee during her visit to the ISKCON in Mayapur had given a go ahead to set up a world centre of religious tourism. Currently, ISKCON is constructing a magnificent temple — Temple of Vedic Planetarium (TOVP) which is expected to be open by 2022 and it is going to put Mayapur in the spotlight of global Tourism industry. With the support of the WB Government ISKCON has also planned to build Sri Chaitanya Cultural World Heritage Centre (SCCWHC) spread over 750 acres of land in Mayapur. Also Read – Bengal civic volunteer dies in road mishap on national highwayAnnually more than 65 lakh devotees, pilgrims visit Mayapur. Currently, home to devotees from almost 70 countries , who study and practice Krishna Consciousness, Mayapur is set to grow in near future. In the last 50 years, ISKCON has developed the entire of NabadwipMandala, which comprises 9 islands where Sri Chaitanya Maha Prabhuhad performed his divine pastimes(leela). The five-minute video is currently played on many social media platforms and exhibitions. It is shot inside ISKCON Mayapur campus during Gaur Purnimafestival , which is the biggest festival of Mayapur. It showcases how beautifully devotees from all over the globe irrespective of caste, colour, colour, celebrate the festival with fervour from MahaAbishekof the deities to making garlands, performing ecstatic Kirtans, following the Vedic traditions of chanting mantras, said Subroto Das, Media Spokesperson of ISKCON.last_img read more

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Another delay in case of man accused of killing four people in

first_imgFREDERICTON — There is yet another delay in the case of a Fredericton man accused of murdering two police officers and two civilians in an August shooting spree.Provincial court Judge Julian Dickson has adjourned the case until next Wednesday for a decision on a request for an assessment to determine if Matthew Raymond is fit to stand trial.Dickson has imposed a publication ban on any information or arguments dealing with that application.Last week, the case had been adjourned to allow the courts to appoint new defence counsel for Raymond.That new counsel is Moncton-based lawyer Alison Menard.Raymond is charged with first-degree murder in the deaths of Fredericton police constables Sara Burns and Robb Costello, and civilians Donnie Robichaud and Bobbie Lee Wright on Aug. 10 outside an apartment complex on the northside of the city.Raymond had said he felt he was not being defended by his first lawyer — Nathan Gorham — and tried numerous times to fire him.During a previous court appearance, Raymond suggested Gorham was withholding evidence that would allow him to be “exonerated” immediately because of temporary insanity.“Mr. Raymond’s obviously mistaken belief that Mr. Gorham could present evidence to exonerate him at this stage of proceeding suggests that possibly he is unable to understand the nature of the proceedings,” Dickson said last week.“Mr. Raymond’s statements also suggest to me that he is not able to communicate meaningfully with counsel or to understand the role of counsel.”During previous court appearances, Raymond had a long greying beard, but was clean shaven Wednesday.Unlike previous appearances, he did not try to speak to the judge.Raymond is alleged to have fired from his apartment window with a long gun, killing the two civilians as they loaded a car for a trip, and the two police officers as they responded to the scene.Costello, 45, was a 20-year police veteran with four children, while Burns, 43, had been an officer for two years and was married with three children.Robichaud, 42, had three children and had recently entered into a relationship with 32-year-old Wright when they were killed.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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“Flu” Prevents Bouteflika From Meeting Mohammed bin Salman

Rabat – The office of Algeria’s President Abdelaziz Bouteflika announced earlier today that the head of state, who was set to host Saudi Arabia’s crown prince, had to cancel the meeting due to acute flu. The Saudi prince arrived in Algeria late on Sunday for a two-day visit as part of his “world tour.”The cancellation of the meeting between Mohammed bin Salman and the Algerian president is likely to result in speculations that Bouteflika withdrew himself from the scheduled meeting with MBS to avoid criticism. At the announcement of the Saudi prince’s plan to visit Algeria, activists and some politicians raised their voice to object to the visit, calling it an “insult” and an “affront” to the country’s history. The public outcry that surrounded MBS visit–both in Algeria and in other countries in the Maghreb region–may have to the Algerian president’s last-minute change of heart regarding the pair’s meeting, many have suggested.Meanwhile, other speculations include heightened concern about Bouteflika’s deteriorating health and his fitness for Office. Seizing the “flu” opportunity, some are asking whether Bouteflika is able to run a presidential campaign during the 2019 election.In power since 1999, Bouteflika seeks re-election for a fifth term during the 2019 Algerian presidential elections. The National Liberation Front (FLN), Algeria’s ruling party, confirmed the president’s decision to run for a fifth term. FLN leadership is unanimously supporting Bouteflika’s fifth term aspirations, plainly disregard concerns over the ailing president’s degrading health conditions.  Former French Ambassador to Algeria Bernard Bajolet also questioned Bouteflika’s ability to lead. He said that Bouteflika is kept alive “artificially.”Last week, CEO of Cevital Algerie Issad Rebrab  said that Bouteflika is not even “aware” of the recent developments happening in the country. “An invisible hand is governing Algeria,” the businessman said.Amid speculations about Bouteflika’s decision not to personally host MBS, AFP reported that the crown prince’s visit in Algeria was greeted with outcry. A group of 17 “prominent journalists and intellectuals” harshly criticized MBS’ presence in Algeria, according to AFP.Read Also: ‘No to the Murderer’: Tunisians Protest MBS’s VisitAbderrazak Makri of the Islamist Movement of Society for Peacesaid that MBS’s visit “does not serve Algeria’s image nor its reputation.”Bouteflika suffered a debilitating stroke in 2013. Several analysts and journalists recommended Bouteflika withdraw from the presidential election, questioning his ability to lead.The same scenario happened when MBS offered to include Morocco in his world tour. King Mohammed VI, however, refused to personally receive him due to busy agenda. read more

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Climate change missing as US defends Arctic policy

ROVANIEMI, Finland — The Arctic is melting, but don’t ask U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to mention climate change.For the Trump administration, disappearing sea ice in the world’s “high north” is first and foremost an opportunity to exploit rather than a crisis to mitigate.That position was made clear by Pompeo over two days as the foreign ministers of the eight members of the Arctic Council met in Finland.Official U.S. statements and documents prepared for the meeting do not refer to “climate change” and their scientific focus is limited to reductions in U.S. carbon emissions that predate the administration and research.In a roughly 20-minute speech outlining the Trump administration’s Arctic policy on Monday, Pompeo acknowledged melting ice but didn’t use the phrase “climate change.” In fact, his address was largely an admonition against increasing Russian and Chinese activity in the Arctic. Nor did he indicate that the administration places any priority on easing the melting that scientists say is already causing oceans to rise.“Steady reductions in sea ice are opening new naval passageways and new opportunities for trade, potentially slashing the time it takes for ships to travel between Asia and the West by 20 days,” he said in the speech, which was met with polite but muted applause.“Arctic sea lanes could become the 21st century’s Suez and Panama Canals.”Asked directly about climate change and the Arctic in an interview with a Finnish newspaper, Pompeo declined the opportunity to mention the phrase and downplayed the importance of the Paris climate accord from which President Donald Trump.“My view on this and President Trump’s view on this is what we should put all our emphasis on I outcomes,” he said. “We can call it whatever we like, but I shared some of the data in the speech. The United States is kicking it when it comes to getting its CO2 down. I mean, compare it to China, compare it to Russia, compare it, frankly, to many European nations, each of whom signed the Paris agreement.”According to the statistics he presented, U.S. energy-related CO2 emissions fell by 14% between 2005 and 2017, while global energy-related CO2 emissions increased more than 20%. In terms of black carbon, which is a particular threat to the Arctic, U.S. emissions were 16% below 2013 levels in 2016 and are projected to nearly halve by 2025, he said.“I’m sure it was a good party,” Pompeo said of the negotiations in Paris. “I’m sure it felt good to sign the agreement. But at the end of the day, what matters to human health, what matters to the citizens of the world, is that we actually have an impact on improving health. And our technology, our innovation, the R&D we put in in the United States, that’s what will drive better climatic outcomes, that’s what will create cleaner air and safer drinking water, and that’s what I hope the whole world will focus on.”Pompeo again declined the opportunity to mention “climate change” on Tuesday when he met with Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland who pointedly referred to the phenomenon as she played down a dispute with the United States over the sovereignty of the Northwest Passage.“We have a very close, very fruitful collaboration,” she said. “And actually, as we see the conditions of the Northwest Passage changing with our changing climate, I think that’s actually grounds for closer collaboration with the United States.”Pompeo replied by saying the U.S. is more concerned about Russia and China in the Arctic than ownership of the Northwest Passage.“The challenges in the Arctic aren’t between the United States and Canada, let me assure you,” he said. “There are others that threaten to use it in ways that are not consistent with the rule of law.”Matthew Lee, The Associated Press read more

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Ban Kimoon lauds Arab Leagues commitment to revitalize Middle East peace plan

Yesterday’s announcement by the Arab Ministerial Committee for the Arab Peace Initiative “indicates increased engagement of the League of Arab States to reinvigorate the peace process,” according to a statement issued by Mr. Ban’s spokesperson.The Initiative, adopted during the Beirut Arab Summit in March 2002, is based on the principle of land for peace.The plan calls for Israeli withdrawal from all Arab lands occupied since 1967, recognition of an independent Palestinian State and provision of a just solution to the issue of Palestinian refugees. In return, Arab countries would recognize Israel, end their conflict and normalize relations.Mr. Ban also “looks forward to meeting with” the Initiative’s Ministerial Committee, which was created by the League to promote the peace process.In his opening address at the League of Arab States summit last month, Mr. Ban said that the Initiative “suggests a new way forward for the region” after decades of division over the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. 19 April 2007United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon today welcomed the statement by a committee of League of Arab States regarding the resuscitation of the Arab Peace Initiative, which in the past he has called one of the pillars of the Israeli-Palestinian peace process. read more

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Annan denounces terrorist bomb attack in Mumbai India

A statement issued by a spokesman for the Secretary-General said Mr. Annan “utterly condemns” the attacks and that he is “adamantly opposed to all acts of terrorism, from whatever quarter.”The statement also conveyed Mr. Annan’s condolences to the Government of India and the bereaved families of the victims.

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Ohio State mens basketball signs 4 new recruits

With its season-opener looming, the Ohio State men’s basketball team got a boost for the future Wednesday afternoon.The Buckeyes are scheduled to tip off their 2014-15 season on Friday against the University of Massachusetts-Lowell, but in the meantime, coach Thad Matta had four new players sign national letters of intent on signing day.The class consists of a pair of Texas natives, one Georgia product and one player from Dayton.Guard Austin Grandstaff from Rockwell, Texas, forward Mickey Mitchell of Plano, Texas, center Daniel Giddens from Marietta, Ga., and Dayton Dunbar High School guard A.J. Harris all signed their letters of intent Wednesday, committing their collegiate future to Matta and the Buckeyes.The four signings come a year after Matta brought on the same number of freshman ahead of this season.According to ESPN, all four of the newest Buckeye basketball commits are four-star rated players. Grandstaff received the highest rating with an 87 out of 100 on ESPN’s recruiting website. He, Giddens and Harris are all part of the ESPN 100.Giddens has played with the USA Basketball U16 National Team and averaged a double-double during his junior season at Wheeler High School. Harris was second team All-Ohio last season when he averaged 14.5 points and 6.1 assists. Grandstaff scored 27.1 points per game last season while shooting better than 50 percent from the floor.Mitchell initially made a verbal commitment to OSU before backing out, and then recommiting earlier this year. His older brother — Mike — was a member of the OSU football team last season as a linebacker before deciding to leave the school. On Wednesday, Matta said he was “elated” to have Mitchell sign on with the Buckeyes.According to ESPN, the four players make up the No. 8 recruiting class nationally, and the best class in the Big Ten.While they’ll have to wait until next season to see the new class in action, Matta and the Buckeyes are scheduled to tip off against UMass-Lowell at 7 p.m. at the Schottenstein Center on Friday. read more

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Police hunt Ross from Friends lookalike over shop theft as David Schwimmer

Officers, I swear it wasn’t me.As you can see, I was in New York.To the hardworking Blackpool Police, good luck with the investigation.#itwasntme pic.twitter.com/EDFF9dZoYR— schwim (@DavidSchwimmer) October 24, 2018 Ross from friends lookalike video  David Schwimmer has responded after social media users drew attention to an alleged thief who bears a resemblance to his character in the sitcom Friends.Police in Blackpool had posted on Facebook asking for witnesses to identify a suspect pictured leaving a restaurant carrying what appeared to be a carton of cans.Facebook users quickly piled into the comments section, pointing out the suspect’s likeness to Schwimmer’s character Ross Geller in the well-loved US show.The alleged theft happened on September 20, the post said. He signed off the tweet with the hashtag “It wasn’t me”, and wished officers in Blackpool the best of luck with their investigation. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Friends star David Schwimmer (right) spoofed the beer thief lookalike (left) in a video response to Blackpool PoliceCredit:Blackpool Police/@DavidSchwimmer  Following numerous responses, Lancashire Constabulary replied: “Thank you to everyone for your speedy responses.”We have investigated this matter thoroughly and have confirmed that David Schwimmer was in America on this date.”We’re so sorry it has to be this way.”The story eventually reached Schwimmer in the US, who posted a video of him in an American supermarket carrying a crate of cans down an aisle.  read more

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Singer Chris Brown detained in Paris over rape claim

Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedNeymar rape case dropped over lack of evidenceJuly 31, 2019In “latest news”Kim Kardashian tied up, robbed of millions at gunpoint in ParisOctober 3, 2016In “latest news”IMF boss Lagarde to go on trial in France on December 12September 12, 2016In “latest news” Chris Brown (AFP image)PARIS, France (AFP) — American R&B star Chris Brown is being questioned by police in Paris after being accused of rape, sources close to the inquiry told AFP on Tuesday.A woman has accused Brown, along with his bodyguard and a friend, of raping her in the Mandarin Oriental hotel in Paris on Tuesday night last week, a source close to the case said on condition of anonymity.He is also being questioned over a suspected drugs offence, the source said.French celebrity magazine Closer broke the news earlier Tuesday, saying the 24-year-old woman had met the star in a nightclub near the Champs-Elysees before agreeing to go back to his hotel suite.Le Figaro newspaper had reported earlier that Brown, who has a history of violence, was in the French capital attending shows during men’s fashion week.Brown was convicted in 2009 of beating fellow singer Rihanna, who was then his girlfriend and was forced to miss the Grammy Awards because of her injuries.In 2016, he was arrested and charged with assault with a deadly weapon following a standoff with Los Angeles police, after a woman said he threatened her at his home.He also pleaded guilty to assaulting a fan in Washington in 2014 and was accused of violence by a woman in Las Vegas.Brown was discovered by record label scouts when he was a boy working at his father’s gas station in the US state of Virginia.First identified as a rapper, he then found success with his rich singing voice, but he has been in the news more often in recent years for his legal troubles. read more

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Dissecting the Wii U hardware

first_imgNintendo’s latest console has had something of a rough start. It wasn’t totally clear at the official unveiling what was actually announced, and then later on it was made clear that this was a whole new console. The Wii U is Nintendo’s grand attempt at combining the explosive popularity of the original Wii and the unique gaming experience found in the Nintendo DS in the living room. But what exactly are we getting on November 18?ConsoleNintendo is the last of the consoles to push HD gaming as a standard feature, and doing so means they need the hardware to make that happen. The Wii U is an entirely new console in a familiar looking glossy white or black shell. The console itself is only slightly larger than the original Wii, and almost always laying flat in promotional shots, partially hidden behind that tablet GamePad controller. It’s the guts Nintendo want you to hide away under your TV.Driving the new HD Wii U experience is an Radeon GPU from AMD along with an IBM “Broadway” tri-core processor. Nintendo hasn’t divulged specifics about either the CPU or GPU yet. The two models being offered, Basic ($299.99) and Deluxe ($349.99), are identical interally with the excpetion to the storage. The Basic package will have 8GB of onboard storage, while the Deluxe ships with 32GB. Both models will also have the ability to add removable storage through any of the four USB slots. Any USB storage device will be usable for additional storage, but only after being formatted to function with the Wii U file system.The Wii U will be able to connect to just about any TV, be it through HDMI, S-Video, D-Terminal, Component, or AV and actually ships with a HDMI cable in the box. Onboard WiFi includes 802.11 b/g/n, but also allows for a USB to Ethernet connection for wired access to the Internet. The AV Multi-Out connector allows for analog stereo connections, while HDMI is used for audio otherwise.ControllersThe star of the Wii U show is the all new controller. The Wii U GamePad is a huge 1.1lb controller with a 6.2-inch LCD touchscreen taking center stage. What makes this GamePad unique is how it interacts with the games on the Wii U. The new controller acts almost as a standalone gaming console when in range of the Wii U. There’s still a lot of unknowns when it comes to its features, like the resolution of the screen or the capacity of the rechargeable batteriey, but so far the GamePad feels like a great addition to the Wii U experience.Both versions of the console will come with one of the GamePads and you can only use one at launch. During the Wii U presentation, Reggie Flls-Aime explained that since there were already over 100,000 Wii remotes in circulation, they didn’t feel the need to include one with the console for player two. They will, however, be selling Wii U branded motion controllers, but chances are you have a Wii lying around and spare controllers to make use of.The Nintendo press release confirms the Wii U only supports one GamePad and multiple Wii motion controllers at launch, but some applications and games will possibly support multiple GamePads in the future. When I spoke to Nintendo employees at the US launch event I was told that applications like Nintendo TVii supported two GamePads, allowing the users to access separate profiles and control the television individually. There were no two GamePad demonstrations to show this off, so if it is going to become available it will be part of a future update Nintendo rolls out. Don’t be surprised if it doesn’t appear though, as there’s thought to be technical problems relating to handling communication of multiple GamePads.Not sold with the console, but sure to be available everywhere with the Wii U is the new Pro controller. This accessory bears a striking resemblance to some of the other console controllers on the market right now, but the button layout is just different enough to set them apart when you see them side by side. The Pro controller feels incredibly familiar, and playing games on it is very comfortable.Other AccessoriesAs mentioned above, if you want to play multiplayer games then you are going to need a few Wiimotes and Nunchuks. The Wii versions are compatible with the Wii U, but Nintendo is taking the opportunity to rebrand its Wii peripherals and offer them as true Wii U accessories.Depending on which version of the console you get you may also want or need to invest in a stand for your console and controller. The other confirmed official accessory is a mic. Beyond that we are sure to get a mass of third-party accessories. GamePad screen protectors, charging cables, battery extender add-ons, and of course storage units for the games. All of which is expected to join the Wii U on its November 18 launch day.Final ThoughtsWhen the Wii U is released in November, it will be the first next-gen console on the market with Microsoft and Sony expected launch new hardware within the next couple of years. The Wii U launch is timed just right to catch the holiday season, but will be the most expensive console on the market. Will that count against it? The answer to that question will ultimately come down to the games and just how good Nintendo TVii turns out to be.What Nintendo has achieved is another unique console that has everyone wondering whether it’s any good. But Nintendo will take that as a positive because we all had the same feeling in the weeks before the Wii launched.last_img read more

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Three people killed after shooting in Dutch city

first_img https://jrnl.ie/4802503 Dordrecht lies 25 kilometres southwest of Rotterdam Image: Google Earth 24,843 Views Mon 10:07 PM 3 Comments Monday 9 Sep 2019, 10:07 PM Short URL Image: Google Earthcenter_img THREE PEOPLE HAVE been killed in an apparent family shooting at a home in the southern Dutch city of Dordrecht this evening. “The shooter is believed to have been a policeman who also shot himself,” newspaper De Telegraaf said, adding a fourth family member was seriously wounded and taken to hospital.Rotterdam police tweeted that “three people have been killed and another was seriously wounded” but did not give any further details.“We are at the scene with numerous people to investigate the cause of the incident,” police said, adding that more details would be given later.Dordrecht’s Mayor Wouter Kolff tweeted that he “sympathises with everyone involved”.Dordrecht lies around 25 kilometres (15 miles) southwest of the port city of Rotterdam and is one of the oldest cities in the Dutch province of South Holland.- © AFP 2019 By AFP Dordrecht lies 25 kilometres southwest of Rotterdam Three people killed after shooting in Dutch city The shooter is believed to have been a policeman who also shot himself. Share8 Tweet Email Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlelast_img read more

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Lœil des rennes de lArctique change de couleur selon la saison

first_imgL’œil des rennes de l’Arctique change de couleur selon la saisonDes chercheurs britanniques et norvégiens ont mis en évidence, chez le renne, une modification saisonnière de la physiologie de l’œil. Celle-ci permet au cervidé d’adapter sa vue tour à tour à la longue nuit de l’hiver arctique, puis au long jour estival.  Soleil de minuit et jour quasi-permanent en été, nuit sans fin en hiver : les conditions lumineuses de l’Arctique varient du tout au tout selon les saisons. Mais les rennes qui y vivent parviennent néanmoins à surveiller l’approche des prédateurs tout au long de l’année. Ceci grâce à un phénomène physiologique que viennent de mettre en évidence des scientifiques de l’University College de Londres et de l’Université de Tromsø (Norvège).Beaucoup de mammifères (notamment des animaux nocturnes) possèdent derrière la rétine un tissu appelé tapetum lucidum (“tapis lumineux”) qui réfléchit la lumière vers les photorécepteurs de l’œil pour améliorer la vision de nuit. Mais le renne, lui, possède un tapetum “à géométrie variable” (ou plutôt de couleur variable) : doré durant l’été, il réfléchit les longueurs d’onde de la lumière estivale, tandis que d’un bleu profond pendant l’hiver, il réfléchit les longueurs d’onde de la lumière hivernale bleutée.La fonction d’amplification de la lumière ambiante est ainsi assurée par le tapetum tout au long de l’année. Le changement de couleur de ce tissu serait dû aux variations de pression au niveau de l’œil : l’hiver, la pupille continuellement dilatée augmente cette pression, empêchant le fluide du globe oculaire de s’écouler naturellement. Ceci comprime le tapetum, réduisant l’espace inter-collagène dans ce tissu, qui reflète alors les courtes longueurs d’onde de la lumière bleue de l’hiver arctique.Un avantage qui peut sauver la vie À lire aussiMaladie de Charcot : symptômes, causes, traitement, où en est on ?”C’est la première fois qu’un changement de couleur de ce genre est démontré chez des mammifères. En changeant la couleur du tapetum de leurs yeux, les rennes ont la possibilité de mieux composer avec les différences saisonnières extrêmes entre niveaux de lumière dans leur habitat. Cela leur donne un avantage, en termes de repérage des prédateurs, qui peut leur sauver la vie.”, conclut le Pr Glen Jeffery, de l’University College de Londres, directeur de l’étude publiée dans Proceedings of the Royal Society B.(crédits photo : Dr. Nicholas Tyler, Univ. Tromsø/Dr. Glen Jeffery, Univ. Coll. London)  Le 1 novembre 2013 à 14:12 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

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Explorers Find Weird Caverns at the Bottom of Belizes Great Blue Hole

first_imgNow, two months after the mission ended, scientists are almost done with the 3D sonar map of the sinkhole. Once this map is processed, it will be shared with the Government of Belize and international scientists, so they can study the sinkhole’s geology and environmental data, Aquatica Submarines, the submarine company involved in the expedition, said in a press release.“Our greatest joy is seeing the look on peoples faces as they descend under the surface of the water for the first time to see the life that abounds just outside our daily routine,” Erika Bergman, Aquatica’s chief pilot and oceanographer, told Forbes in an interview. “Exploration changes a person’s perspective, and as a company we intend to keep the spirit of exploration alive with our mission of ‘Taking the World Underwater.’ “ More on Geek.com:NASA Scientists Reproduce Origins of Life on Ocean FloorClimate Change Will Affect the Color of Oceans, Study SaysThese Ocean Robots Spent a Year Collecting Data Under Antarctic Ice Watch: Dolphin Leaps Feet Away From Unsuspecting SurferNASA Says 2 Asteroids Will Safely Fly By Earth This Weekend Stay on targetcenter_img The Great Blue Hole, a giant sinkhole located off the coast of Belize, is a top diving destination that’s home to many marine species. A team of explorers recently traveled below this blue beauty’s surface and discovered strange tracks and formations at the bottom of the ocean floor.Last December, billionaire Richard Branson and Fabien Cousteau, the grandson of French conservationist Jacques Cousteau, joined an expedition to dive to the bottom of the sinkhole and observe its mysterious depths, Newsweek reported. The mission, which aired on the Discovery Channel on Dec. 2, showed viewers the sinkhole’s eerie underwater world.The sinkhole, which is over 1,000 feet wide and 410 feet deep, is one of the most bizarre natural wonders in the world. It first developed as a limestone cave many years ago, when sea levels were low. During the last ice age, sea levels increased again, which caused the cave to submerge below water and eventually receive the nickname “Great Blue Hole.”In December 2018, teams engaged in more than 20 dives to create a 3D map of the sinkhole. While traveling in a submarine and using high-resolution sonar equipment, the exploration discovered never-before-seen structures at the bottom of the sinkhole and other weird features, including overhangs, crevices, and stalactite caverns.last_img read more

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Former ASD Superintendent to lead Minneapolis Public Schools

first_imgAnchorage’s out-going superintendent Ed Graff was chosen to lead the Minneapolis Public Schools. That district has about 12,600 fewer students than Anchorage because the Twin Cities metropolitan area is broken into more districts. Two-thirds of the 35,717 students are people of color.Download AudioThe Anchorage School Board decided not to renew Graff’s contract in October but would not provide specific reasons as to why. He is being replaced by current Mat-Su superintendent Deena Paramo. Graff will stay with ASD until the end of June.last_img read more

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MLA Sudheer Reddy inaugurates additional classrooms

first_imgLB Nagar: Local legislator Devireddy Sudheer Reddy along with corporator M Srinivas Rao inaugurated additional classrooms at the government school here on Sunday. He lauded Jakkireddy Subba Reddy Charitable Educational Trust for their contribution towards construction of the rooms. Jakkireddy Srinivas Reddy, Jakkireddy Sanjeeva Reddy, local leaders Jakkidi Raghuveer Reddy, Adala Ramesh and others were present.last_img

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Congresss Divya Spandhana logs off Twitter deletes personal handle

first_imgCongress spokesperson Divya Spandana.The account was deleted days after she posted a congratulatory tweet to BJP’s Finance Minister, Nirmala Sitharaman for becoming the second woman to hold the seat after 1970. She in her last tweet also referred to the slump in the country’s economic growth. “Congratulations @nsitharaman on taking charge of a portfolio that was only last held by another woman, Indira Gandhiji in 1970 – makes us womenfolk proud! The GDP not looking great, I’m sure you will do your best to revive the economy. You have our support. Best wishes,” was her last tweet.Though unclear, Congress’s month-long ban on spokespersons can also be the reason behind the account deletion. The account was deleted after a tweet from the party spokesperson. “All media channels/editors are requested to not place Congress representatives on their shows,” tweeted Randeep Surjewala, the party spokesperson.When asked about her disinterest in Congress after the general elections to be the reason behind the act; she replied to news agency ANI that they have a wrong source of information.Her absence might not roll well for the Congress after winning 52 seats out of 543 seats in the 2019 General Elections and it might hamper the future prospects of the party’s social media hold.last_img read more

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Agency flouts KMC tariff charges Rs 20 as parking fee

first_imgKolkata: A parking fee collecting agency is illegally charging Rs 20 per hour from car owners on Jawaharlal Nehru Road flouting the tariff of Kolkata Municipal Corporation.The KMC’s tariff is Rs 10 per hour. South End Fee Car Parking Cooperative Society is collecting Rs 20 per hour illegally from car owners. The agency has gone a step further and printed receipts which they are giving to the owners. This has helped the agency to collect lakhs of rupees per month. As the agency is giving a printed receipt most of the car owners do not raise any question and give the money. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataSenior KMC officials when contacted said this is illegal and assured that they will look into the matter. Santanu Samanta, a businessman had taken his wife to a private diagnostic centre on June 11. He parked his car near the Haldiram shop on Jawaharlal Nehru Road. He parked his vehicle at 9.54 am and came back at 12.07 pm. The man collecting the car parking asked him to pay Rs 60 (Rs 20 per hour for three hours) and gave him a receipt. When Samanta said that why was he charging more money, the person said recently the parking fee has been hiked all over the city. “As they gave me receipt I thought that the KMC must have hiked the parking fees. But there was an uncanny feeling that the collector was not telling me the truth,” said Samanta. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in stateHe immediately contacted Tapas Chowdhury, special municipal commissioner who said that no decision to hike the parking fee has been taken by KMC and what the agency has done is illegal. It was learnt that the civic authorities had proposed to hike the parking fee to Rs 20 per hour instead of Rs 10 per hour. But the matter has not yet been implemented. When contacted, the South End Fee car parking Cooperative Society said they had hiked the fee as the KMC officials had told them earlier that they would hike the parking fee.last_img read more

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Breast Density Highlights of the NCoBC 2016 Conference

first_img Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Recent Videos View all 606 items Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Ernie Bodai, M.D., vice president, National Consortium of Breast Centers (NCBC), discusses breast density with itnTV. Read an article with related links about breast density. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Technology Reports View all 9 items Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Find more SCCT news and videos Highlights of the NCoBC 2016 Conference: Breast DensityErnie Bodai, M.D., vice president, National Consortium of Breast Centers (NCBC), discusses breast density with itnTV.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 9:14Loaded: 2.23%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -9:14 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Find more SCCT news and videos Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Information Technology View all 220 items Conference Coverage View all 396 items Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.center_img Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Find more SCCT news and videos Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Women’s Health View all 62 items Videos | Breast Density | May 20, 2016 Breast Density – Highlights of the NCoBC 2016 Conference Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. last_img read more

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Australian police arrest teen disrupt bomb plot

first_img New Valley school lets students pick career-path academies Former Arizona Rep. Don Shooter shows health improvement CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Police arrested a 17-year-old and accused him of plotting to detonate three homemade bombs in the Australian city of Melbourne, officials said on Saturday, in the latest terrorism scare involving a teenager.The teen was arrested on Friday afternoon in a joint federal-state police counterterrorism operation at his home in the suburb of Greenvale where the explosive devices were found, Australian Federal Police Deputy Commissioner Mike Phelan said. The state police bomb squad rendered the devices safe, he said. Comments   Share   Police had contained the plot and there was no further threat from the suspect or his colleagues to the people of Victoria, Phelan said.Prime Minister Tony Abbott said he had been briefed that the bomb plot had been in a “reasonably advanced state of preparation.”Abbott urged Australians to keep the terrorist danger in perspective and to avoid changing their way of life.“The best thing that you can do right now is to live your life normally because the whole point of terrorism is to scare us out of being ourselves,” Abbott told reporters.The teen was driving from his home with a woman when he was stopped by police, Victoria Police Deputy Commissioner Bob Hill said. Police then ordered three occupants of the house to come outside, he said. Media reported they came out with their hands up.The boy’s father is reportedly a doctor of Syrian background. The family was unaware that bombs were stored in their two-story home.Hill said “his family are a caring, loving family that are now very, very distraught as a consequence of what is alleged.”“It has undoubtedly taken them by surprise,” Hill said.Phelan described the homemade bombs as “very rudimentary.” Their destructive capacity had yet to be assessed, he said. Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Ex-FBI agent details raid on Phoenix body donation facility Milstead says best way to stop wrong-way incidents is driving sobercenter_img 5 treatments for adult scoliosis Top Stories Melbourne is Australia’s second largest city and is the capital of Victoria state.Last month, five Australian teenagers were arrested on suspicion of plotting an Islamic State group-inspired terrorist attack at a Veterans’ Day ceremony also in Melbourne that included targeting police officers.“It’s deeply troubling to police that such young people in our community are becoming disaffected in the way in which they are and considering endangering the lives of many Australians,” Phelan told reporters.There were “no links at all” between that latest suspect and those arrested last month, Phelan said. Police were investigating whether the latest plot had been inspired by the Islamic State group .Phelan said he could not confirm a media report that the plot would have targeted a charity run in Melbourne on Sunday to mark Mothers’ Day in Australia. He said police were examining evidence and going through intelligence reports to get the full picture. “But let me tell you something was going to happen,” Phelan told reporters.“Had we not intervened, there was a real threat of action being taken,” he added.The suspect will appear in the Melbourne Children’s Court on Monday on terrorism charges. His identity cannot be revealed for legal reasons. Sponsored Stories The difference between men and women when it comes to pain How do cataracts affect your vision?last_img read more

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