Botrytis Blight in Landscape

first_imgThe late-spring sun is cranking up the heat. It’s hard to believe the long, cold winteris still causing problems in Georgia landscapes.”We’ve had a lot of Botrytis blight in landscape plants this spring,” saidJean Williams-Woodward, a plant pathologist with the University of Georgia ExtensionService.Botrytis blight is caused by a fungus, Botrytis cinerea, she said. Commonlyknown as “gray mold,” it’s the most common pathogen in any greenhouse, nurseryor landscape. It attacks any aboveground part of many vegetable and landscape plants.”Botrytis is always a problem for any flowering plant,” Williams-Woodwardsaid. “The problem this spring has been mostly in bedding plants. It hasn’t been toobad in woody ornamentals.”The problem started, she said, in the state’s greenhouses, mostly because of the winterthat didn’t want to end.”Greenhouse growers had all these bedding plants ready to go, but it was still toocold,” Williams-Woodward said. “They couldn’t sell them.”Waiting for spring sales to rev up, growers wound up having to hold the plants a monthlonger than they normally would have. And the plants suffered from having to be held solong. Some flowers dropped off, and leaves yellowed.Now the plants are in the landscape, where Botrytis is easier to control because theplants are more spread out. But it’s still something to contend with.Because the injured and yellowing tissues are more vulnerable, Williams-Woodward saidBotrytis blight could be more of a problem in landscapes this year.Botrytis attacks these old flowers and leaves and other weak tissues first, she said.Then it spreads into healthy tissue. On bedding plants, Botrytis often causes leaf spotswhen infected flowers drop onto leaves. It’s most active under wet conditions and when thehumidity is high and the air is stagnant.Williams-Woodward said the fungus is easy to identify. With a magnifying glass, andoften without it, she said, you can see a gray-brown web and grape-like clusters of sporeson infected tissues.”The spores are dry and are easily dispersed by air movement,” she said.”Overhead watering and rain disperse the spores, too. The force of the water dropletlanding on a leaf creates a shock wave that dislodges the spores into the air.”Splashing water droplets can carry the spores to nearby plants, too.”Pick up a plant with Botrytis sometime and gently flick the infected plantpart,” she said. “A cloud of spores can usually be seen floating in the airabove the plant.”Controlling Botrytis in the landscape takes a little cleaning up, using a fungicide andmaybe changing a few things around your plants.”Prune dead and injured stems from cold-damaged plants,” Williams-Woodwardsaid. “Clean the ground (and the inside of pots) of dead, fallen leaf litter. Andremove yellowing leaves from the base of plants.”People who pay regular attention to their plants can prevent the spread of the fungus.Picking off and discarding spent flowers and yellowing leaves as they show up will oftenkeep plants healthy.You may need to space your plants farther apart, too, to allow for better aircirculation. If Botrytis is a problem, don’t use overhead irrigation, she said.Because the fungal spores spread around so easily, fungicides can be important incontrolling Botrytis.”Spray a protective fungicide after the plants are free of blighted tissue,”Williams-Woodward said. “Consult your county agent to find out which fungicide to usefor a particular plant.”last_img read more

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Comcast rolls out 50 MBPS Internet service in Vermont

first_img(Vermont Biz April 6, 2010) – Comcast, a leading provider of entertainment, information and communications products and services, today announced it has made the leap from broadband to wideband with the launch of next-generation DOCSIS 3.0 in 29 communities across Vermont.  With wideband, Comcast has introduced a new echelon of Internet speeds, redefining the customer experience online and creating a platform for Internet innovation in the years ahead.Comcast now offers among the fastest speeds available today with wideband, including the Extreme 50 tier with download speeds of up to 50 Mbps.  Wideband has also enabled Comcast to double speeds for the majority of its existing residential high-speed Internet customers.The new extreme speeds are now available to residential homes and businesses in the communities of Burlington, Essex, Huntington, Saint George, South Burlington, Williston and Winooski, as well as the Addison County communities of Bristol, Lincoln, Middlebury, Monkton, New Haven, and Starksboro.  Comcast also offers wideband speeds in the Upper Valley area in the towns of Bridgewater, Cavendish, Chester, Hartford, Hartland, Londonderry, Ludlow, Norwich, Plymouth, Reading, Springfield, Weathersfield, West Windsor, Weston, Windsor and Woodstock.“Wideband utilizes our existing advanced fiber-optic network in neighborhoods across our footprint to dramatically enhance our customers’ online experience,” said Pam Mackenzie, Vice President for Comcast in Vermont.  “This new service will enable us to continue to offer our customers even faster speeds and an entirely new realm of Internet innovation.”As part of the wideband deployment, Comcast has launched a new 50 Mbps premium speed tier to its residential and business customers.  This new service is ideal for households or businesses simultaneously using several computers or Internet-connected devices.  They also appeal to those who simply want some of the fastest speeds available today:New Residential TierExtreme 50, offers up to 50 Mbps of downstream speed and up to 10 Mbps of upstream speed at $99.95 a month.*With Extreme 50, Comcast customers will be able to download a high-definition movie (6 GB) in about 16 minutes, a standard-definition movie (2 GB) in about five minutes and a standard-definition TV show (300 MB) in a matter of seconds.  Customers with Extreme 50 also will be able to download digital photos, songs and games faster than ever.In addition to the new speed tier, Comcast also is increasing speeds for most of its existing customers:Performance tier customers will benefit from doubled downstream and upstream speeds, offering up to 12 Mbps and 2 Mbps, respectively.Performance Plus customers will be upgraded to Comcast’s Blast! tier, which will double their download speeds to up to 16 Mbps and provide up to 2 Mbps of upload speed. Plus, with PowerBoost technology, customers are able to enjoy even faster speeds to download and upload files such as videos, games, music and photos.New Business Class TiersBusiness customers will also benefit from wideband with increased efficiency and productivity.  Customers can sign up for the Deluxe 50 Mbps / 10 Mbps tier for $189.95 a month, which includes a full suite of features and support.  As part of their service, Comcast Business Class customers receive Microsoft Communication Services, providing corporate class e-mail, calendaring and document sharing, as well as additional benefits such as firewall protection, static IP addresses, multiple e-mail addresses and business class 24/7 customer support.  Existing Business Class customers also will receive speed increases in the near future – speeds on the Starter tier will be doubled to up to 12 Mbps / 2 Mbps – and a second new Premium Tier is also now available, offering speeds up to 22 Mbps / 5 Mbps for $99.95 a monthAs of today, Comcast has rolled out the new wideband technology to more than 75 percent of its footprint across the nation, which means that more than 38 million homes and businesses can now enjoy one of the fastest Internet services in the country.For more information on Comcast’s wideband services, customers can call 1-800-COMCAST or visit www.comcast.com/fastestfast(link is external).* Pricing for residential customers and requires subscription to Comcast Cable service.About Comcast in VermontSince entering Vermont in November 2006, Comcast has aggressively expanded its services across the state, investing in its advanced fiber-optic network to bring broadband services to previously unserved homes and businesses and partnering with local communities.  The company has launched a number of its advanced services in this time, including Digital Cable with On Demand, High-Definition Television Service, Digital Video Recorders, Comcast High-Speed Internet service, Digital Voice, and the company’s Business Class suite of voice, Internet and cable television services for small and medium-sized businesses.  In addition, Comcast has offered programming of special interest to Vermonters.  Comcast also assists local non-profit organizations in Vermont with financial, in-kind and employee volunteer support.About Comcast CorporationComcast Corporation (Nasdaq: CMCSA, CMCSK) (www.comcast.com(link is external)) is one of the nation’s leading providers of entertainment, information and communication products and services.  With 23.6 million cable customers, 15.9 million high-speed Internet customers, and 7.6 million Comcast Digital Voice customers, Comcast is principally involved in the development, management and operation of cable systems and in the delivery of programming content.Comcast’s content networks and investments include E! Entertainment Television, Style Network, Golf Channel, VERSUS, G4, PBS KIDS Sprout, TV One, 11 regional sports networks operated by Comcast Sports Group and Comcast Interactive Media, which develops and operates Comcast’s Internet businesses, including Comcast.net (www.comcast.net(link is external)).  Comcast also has a majority ownership in Comcast-Spectacor, which owns two professional sports teams, the Philadelphia 76ers NBA basketball team and the Philadelphia Flyers NHL hockey team, and a large, multipurpose arena in Philadelphia, the Wachovia Center, and manages other facilities for sporting events, concerts and other events.Source: SOUTH BURLINGTON, VT – (April 6, 2010) – Comcast# # #last_img read more

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